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Church St. Joseph by stengchen

Salvete all!
 
“God has made me a father to the King and master of all His household.  
He has raised me up, that He might save many people.”
- Responsory from the Office of St. Joseph
 
Happy Solemnity of St. Joseph, the Husband of Mary and the Foster-Father of Jesus Christ! Well, it’s certainly been an interesting start to the year. I haven’t been able to get out as much artwork as I would like, so I really need to work on that. I was hoping Lent would give me the opportunity to rid myself of a number of my distractions so I can do more artwork, but unfortunately, I am my own source of distraction, and will use other things as a means to distract myself unless I really kick the lazy in the butt. ;-) I have a number of projects I’ve been working on, and hopefully those will get done soon. I’ve also, rather unfortunately, had to start watermarking my artwork. I’ve had a number of people suggest that I do so, since I’ve had some problems in the past with people using my artwork without permission. Thankfully it hasn’t happened very much, but still, I figured I probably ought to, even if I dislike watermarks. The new dA watermarks aren’t too obtrusive so it shouldn’t be too bad. Sorry everyone about that. :hmm:
 
I feel like I haven’t done too much since last I updated. As I said, I have a number of artworks sitting around, unfinished, on my desk (it seems I haven’t been able to do too much art), but I have gotten a number of books read. During the month of February I was working part-time at a desk job doing some very boring (but very necessary) work. Fortunately, the nature of the job was such that I could listen to audiobooks while I worked without it interfering with doing my job. So actually it was rather fun to go into work, listen to a book all day, get paid for it, and then go home. :D I only listened to shorter books (the ones available averaged about 7-8 hours) and so I read: Treasure Island, The Secret Garden (I can’t believe I had never read that one before, I really, really liked it. :nod:), A Little Princess, The Hound of the Baskervilles (the only Sherlock Holmes I hadn’t read before, interestingly enough), and The Wizard of Oz (which was dull and tedious). I started some other books, but I never managed to finish them. Tom Sawyer was one. I liked Mark Twain’s writing style well enough, but I wasn’t sufficiently engaged to get through all of it. I hated Alice in Wonderland. I got about two thirds through it and wondered why I bothered. I suppose non-sensical literature just doesn’t appeal to me. I didn’t see the purpose to the story (I’m not sure if there really is one), and it didn’t amuse me (which, if it had a purpose, was probably what it was supposed to do), so I gave up reading it. I also started Robinson Crusoe, but the writing style irked me, and I didn’t get very far.
 
Those were the audiobooks. Back in January and February I “binged” on Alfred Duggan, a historical fiction writer I’ve come to like very much. I checked out all the books from the library by him that I could get a hold of and read them all. I had read his book Count Bohemond a couple summers ago, and I had enjoyed it. So I started with Knight with Armor (a book about the First Crusade), The Lady for Ransom (about a group of Norman mercenaries fighting their way through Asia Minor in the wake of the Battle of Manzikert), Leopards and Lilies (about the wife of Sir Falkes de Breauté, and ending with the siege of Bedford Castle) and The Falcon and the Dove (a biographical sketch of the life and times of St. Thomas Becket). All quite enjoyable. I like his writing style very much, and of course, I am quite partial to the time periods he picks. He also does a very good job of conveying the feel of the period without being either overly sentimental or crude and brutish; the first being the Victorian fashion, the latter being the fashion nowadays (when somehow realism = “gritty”, ie, over-sensationalized: crass, over-sexed and over-violent, all of which is often laughably conveyed). He also does a lot of historical fiction set in the Roman period, though I have not been able to get my hands on any of those.
 
I was also finally able to finish The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (there are beautiful gems in there), King Lear and The Knight’s own book of Chivalry. I am currently reading: David Copperfield by Charles Dickens (well, listening to, since it’s an audiobook, and a large one at that), St. Francis of Assisi by G.K. Chesterton, and Herald of Divine Love by St. Gertrude the Great.
 
I think that’s it for books. In the meantime, I got a DD on the 16th (right before St. Patrick’s Day) on my Sonnet 18! That was a pleasant little surprise.
 
By, the by, if you guys want a good laugh, go to Amazon.com and read the reviews of ‘sugarfree Haribo gummy bears.’ I’m telling you, I’ve rarely laughed so hard in my life. :XD:

Oh! I came across a good meditation yesterday, from the Magnificat Lenten Companion that I want to share with you all:
 
“Once when I was in college, religion came up in a class discussion. One of my classmates said, “To me, Christianity is just more rules.” My classmate was talking about a way of looking at religion that is called moralism. Moralistic religion says that faith is about doing good things and being a good person. Just follow the rules and you’ll get to Heaven. In today’s Gospel [Matthew 23:1-12], Jesus accuses the Pharisees of hypocrisy and pride, but at the heart of both these is moralism. When you put your faith in your good deeds to save you, you tend to become very proud of them and want to show them off to the world. And then when you fail at living up to the moral standards you put so much emphasis on, you want to hide your failings. Christianity is an utterly anti-moralistic religion that tries to squash this pride and hypocrisy. Our faith is primarily a relationship with Jesus Christ, and not, first and foremost, about following the rules. We obey the rules because we love God, and we love God because He loved us first in a free gift that we did nothing to earn. Love is the center of our Faith: the endless love that flows within the Trinity and into which we are drawn through grace.”
 
Heavenly Father, help me to keep your commandments because I love you, and not because I seek my self-worth in my good deeds.
 
Reflection based on Matthew 23:1-12, by Peter Blair

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 San Jose XIV by Meldelen
“Behold the good and faithful servant whom the Lord has placed in charge of His household.” - Entrance

Today’s Liturgy in honor of St. Joseph brings out the chief characteristics of this humble, silent man who occupied a place of first importance in the entrance of the Son of God into human history. A descendant of David—“son of David” as the Gospel says (Matthew 1:20)—he is the link that joins Christ to that line of descent from which Israel awaited the Messiah. Thus the prophecy made to David is verified through the humble carpenter of Nazareth: “Your house and your kingdom shall be made sure for ever before me; your throne shall be established forever” (II Samuel 7:16, First Reading). Joseph is not the natural father of Jesus for he did not give Him life, but he is the virginal father who, by the divine command, fulfills a legal function in His regard: he gives Him a Name, establishes Him in his household, acts as His guardian, provides for His sustenance. This very intimate relationship with Jesus comes to him through his marriage with Mary.
 
Joseph is the “just man” (Matthew 1:19) to whom was entrusted the mission of being the virginal spouse of the most exalted of God’s creatures, and the virginal father of the Son of the Most High. He is “just” in the full sense of the word, which signifies perfect virtue and holiness. He possesses a justice which pervades his whole being, through a total purity of heart and life, a total adherence to God and to His Will. All this takes place in a pattern of life that is as humble and hidden as possible, and yet is resplendent with faith and love. “The just man lives by faith” (Romans 1:171); and Joseph, the pre-eminently “just man” lives this virtue to its maximum.
 
The second reading very fittingly (Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22) speaks of Abraham’s faith, presenting it as a type or symbol of St. Joseph’s. Abraham believed “against hope” (ib. 18) that he would become the father of a great family, and he continued to believe it even when, in obedience to the divine command, he was about to sacrifice his only son. Faced with the confusing mystery of Mary’s motherhood, Joseph believed the angel’s words: “That which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:20), and, cutting short all hesitation, obeyed his command: “Do not fear to take Mary, your wife” (Matthew 1:20). Even more than Abraham, he had to believe what was humanly unthinkable: the motherhood of a virgin, the Incarnation of the Son of God. Because of his faith and obedience, he merited to have these great mysteries accomplished under his roof.
 
The entire life of St. Joseph was one prolonged act of faith and obedience in the most obscure and humanly difficult circumstances. Shortly after the birth of Jesus he heard the words: “Rise, take the Child and His Mother, and flee to Egypt” (Matthew 2:13) and later, the angel of the Lord commanded: “Go into the land of Israel” (Matthew 2:20). Immediately—by night—Joseph obeyed. He did not delay, did not ask for explanations, did not offer objections. He is literally, “the wise and faithful steward, whom his master will set over His household” (Luke 14:42), entirely at God’s service, always ready at His signal, on the alert to serve Him. A dedication such as this reveals a perfect love; Joseph loved God with all his heart, with all his mind, with all his strength.
 
His position as head of the Holy Family, caused him to enter into a special intimacy with God whose place he held; he carried out His orders, and interpreted His Will in regard to Mary whose husband he was and in regard to the Son of God made man, whom he saw grow under his very eyes, whom he sustained by his labor. Ever since the angel had revealed to him the secret of Mary’s motherhood, Joseph lived in an orbit of the mystery of the Incarnation; he was its spectator, its guardian, its adorer and its servant. His existence was to be consumed in these duties, in a climate of communion with Jesus and Mary, and of silent and adoring prayer. He neither had not sought anything for himself; Jesus called him father, but Joseph knew well that He was not his son, and Jesus Himself would confirm this: “Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” (Luke 2:49). Mary was his wife, but Joseph knew that she belonged exclusively to God, and he watched over her for Him, assisting her in her mission as Mother of the Son of God. Then when his work was no longer needed, he disappeared in silence. St. Joseph still occupies a most important place in the Church, continuing, for the entire family of believers, the work of silent and provident guardianship begun for the little family of Nazareth. Thus the Church venerates him, and invokes him as its protector, and thus too the faithful regard him while they study to imitate his virtues. For all of us, in the dark moments of life, St. Joseph’s example is an encouragement to unshakeable faith, to unreserved adherence to the Will of God, to unstinting service.
 
O Joseph, proclaim…the wonders that your eyes have contemplated: you saw the Infant resting in the arms of the Virgin; you adored Him with the Wise Men; you gave glory to God with the shepherds according to the angel’s words: pray to Christ, God, that our souls may be saved…
 
Your soul was ever obedient to the divine command; And filled with a purity without equal, O blessed Joseph, You deserved to receive as a bride her who is pure and immaculate among women; You were the guardian of this Virgin, when she merited to become the Tabernacle of the Creator…
 
You led the pure Virgin from the city of David into Egypt, that holy Virgin who was like a mysterious cloud that keeps the Sun of Justice hidden in its breast…O Joseph, priest of the incomprehensible mystery!
 
With what wisdom, O Joseph, you assisted God who became a Child in the flesh; you served Him like one of his angels; He enlightened you directly; you welcomed within you His spiritual rays. O blessed one! You seemed all resplendent with light in your heat and in your soul. He who with one word has shaped Heaven, earth and sea, was called the workman’s son, your son, O wonderful Joseph! You were constituted father of Him who is without beginning, and who glorified you as the minister of a mystery tat surpasses all understanding.
 
How precious was your death in the eyes of the Lord, O blessed Joseph! Consecrated to the Lord from infancy, you were the holy guardian of the Blessed Virgin, and you sang with her the canticle: “Let every creature bless the Lord, exalt and praise Him for ever and ever. Amen.”
- Hymn of the Greek Church, from Les plus beaux texts sur St. Joseph
 
 O Joseph, man of wisdom, rich in goodness…you were made holy by holding Christ in your arms. Now sanctify those who celebrate your memory, O just one, Joseph most holy, husband of the all-holy Mother of God…O happy one, never cease asking the Word to free from temptation those who venerate you. You watched over the Immaculate One, who was ever a virgin, within whom the Word was made flesh. You watched over her after the mysterious birth. O Joseph, who bore God in your arms, remember us with her.
- Giuseppe l’Innografo, from Les plus beaux texts sur St. Joseph
 
- meditation by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.

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San Jose XI by Meldelen
 
There is a general rule concerning all special graces granted to any human being. Whenever the divine favor chooses someone to receive a special grace, or to accept a lofty vocation, God adorns the person chosen with all the gifts of the Spirit needed to fulfill the task at hand.
 
This general rule is especially verified in the case of Saint Joseph, the foster-father of our Lord and the husband of the Queen of our world, enthroned above the angels. He was chosen by the eternal Father as the trustworthy guardian and protector of his greatest treasures, namely, his divine Son and Mary, Joseph’s wife. He carried out this vocation with complete fidelity until at last God called him, saying: Good and faithful servant enter into the joy of your Lord.
 
What then is Joseph’s position in the whole Church of Christ? Is he not a man chosen and set apart? Through him and, yes, under him, Christ was fittingly and honorably introduced into the world. Holy Church in its entirety is indebted to the Virgin Mother because through her it was judged worthy to receive Christ. But after her we undoubtedly owe special gratitude and reverence to Saint Joseph.
 
In him the Old Testament finds its fitting close. He brought the noble line of patriarchs and prophets to its promised fulfillment. What the divine goodness had offered as a promise to them, he held in his arms.
 
Obviously, Christ does not now deny to Joseph that intimacy, reverence and very high honor which he gave him on earth, as a son to his father. Rather we must say that in heaven Christ completes and perfects all that he gave at Nazareth.
Now we can see how the last summoning words of the Lord appropriately apply to Saint Joseph: Enter into the joy of your Lord. In fact, although the joy of eternal happiness enters into the soul of a man, the Lord preferred to say to Joseph: Enter into joy. His intention was that the words should have a hidden spiritual meaning for us. They convey not only that this holy man possesses an inward joy, but also that it surrounds him and engulfs him like an infinite abyss.
 
Remember us, Saint Joseph, and plead for us to your foster-child. Ask your most holy bride, the Virgin Mary, to look kindly upon us, since she is the mother of him who with the Father and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns eternally. Amen.
- From a sermon by Saint Bernadine of Siena, priest

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
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POSTERS
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Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


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Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

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Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppes– Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
5. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
6. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
7. The Decameron– Boccaccio
8. Woman - Edith Stein
9. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
10. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
11. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
12. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy

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Add a Comment:
 
:iconbelianis:
belianis Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I want to make an image of the death of Joseph; is there a prayer or poem associated with it, please?
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm sure there probably is; you can try and google one if you'd like. I found a poem about Holy Saturday that, I think, paints a beautiful portrait of St. Joseph: dariasockey.blogspot.com/2012/…
Reply
:iconaranov:
Aranov Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
Ooohhh I love a good historical novel. I will have to look up this person! And YAY audiobooks! That sounds like definitely-not-the-worst job. :D I really know what you mean about being your own distraction though. D: I hope you improve your self-discipline. It's definitely something I should work on myself. x_x
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh do! And tell me what you think of him if you do! I haven't run into too many people who have read anything by Alfred Duggan.
Reply
:iconaranov:
Aranov Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
I will! Is there one you would suggest to read first?
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hmmm....well, I guess it depends what you like. If you don't want to jump right into the Crusades, I might start with Lady for Ransom or Leopards and Lilies. :nod:
Reply
:iconaranov:
Aranov Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
Okay. I will definitely look. :D
Reply
:iconmeldelen:
Meldelen Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Thank you for choosing my humble photos to illustrate your Journal :)
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You have BEAUTIFUL photos, so thank you for sharing them!
Reply
:iconmeldelen:
Meldelen Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Thank you very much for appreciating my humble and amateur photography, you're so kind :D
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
For being an amateur you have wonderful photography skills. Besides that, I love your subject matter. ;-)
Reply
:iconmeldelen:
Meldelen Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I'm truly flattered :D Though this subject matter is not really appreciated in DeviantArt, as I can see. A lot of my works are rejected in so many groups despise fitting the rules and terms, just because is Christian or even Catholic art. Well... Thanks always for your kindness! 
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, it's too bad, but I can't say I'm terribly surprised either, alas. It seems a lot of people can't appreciate religious artwork. :(
Reply
:iconmeldelen:
Meldelen Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Religious CHristian artwork, unfortunately. They are usually more tolerant with artwork of other religions. I think all religious art must be respected.
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner May 31, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's true, unfortunately. :( I forget who said it, but the gist of the quote was that anti-Catholicism is the last acceptable prejudice. :hmm:
Reply
:icondcjbeers:
DCJBeers Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2014
Happy Lent from the St. Joseph's chapter of Dominican Laity
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you! I hope you're having a good Lent! :hug:
Reply
:icondcjbeers:
DCJBeers Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014
It is going by to fast! But then again my Uncle did tell me when I was a child, that once you hit 21 the days start to fly by, and at 52 I can honestly say he was right. April 1st my mother has been gone for ten years, she was only 64. I can't ell you where the time went. But I ramble.
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm 22 and I can quite agree! Life is flying by so quickly!
Reply
:iconfirefiriel:
FireFiriel Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, like I've been saying, our literary tastes: nothing alike. Except I believe we agree on Chesterton. :D

I love work that leaves the mind free! Anyhoo, hope you have a good Lent.
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Most possible, I'm sure. I'm fine with that though. There is, after all, a wide range of perfectly legitimate literary taste out there. :)

I hope you're having a good Lent too! I can't believe it's almost Holy Week! O.O
Reply
:iconfirefiriel:
FireFiriel Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Yeah, time is going by fast!
Reply
:iconneoconvoy:
Neoconvoy Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2014  Student General Artist
Happy Solemnity of St. Joseph!
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:glomp:
Reply
:icondagokrakus:
DagoKrakus Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Neogothic church of St. Joseph in Podgórze distict in Cracow ;-) cracowpoland2013.deviantart.co…
Reply
:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow! Stunning! I love neo-gothic buildings! :D
Reply
:icondagokrakus:
DagoKrakus Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
:D (Big Grin) :D (Big Grin) :D (Big Grin) 
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