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  • Listening to: "Jesu Dulcis Memoria" - Cathedral Singers
  • Reading: History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea
  • Watching: "Poldark"
  • Playing: Age of Mythology


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"O Jesus, I see this new year as a blank page that your Father is giving me, upon which He will write day by day what He has arranged for me in His divine pleasure. With full confidence I am writing at the top of the page from now on: "Lord, do with me what you will." And at the bottom I have already put my "Amen" to every disposition of Your divine will. Yes, O Lord, I say "yes" to all the joys, to all the sorrows, to all the graces, to all the hardships that you have prepared for me and which You will be revealing to me day by day. Let me "amen" be the Paschal AMEN, always followed by the ALLELUIA, uttered with all my heart in the joy of perfect giving. Give me your love and your grace and I shall be rich enough." - Sister Carmela of the Holy Ghost

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Time passes and does not return. God has assigned to each of us a definite time in which to fulfill His divine plan for our soul, the time of our life on earth. For each of us this is "the acceptable time…the day of salvation" (2 Cor 6:2), in which we must work diligently to cooperate with the grace given us for our sanctification; we have only this time and shall have no more. Time ill spent is lost forever. Our life is made up of this uninterrupted, continual flow of time, which never returns. In eternity, on the contrary, time will be no more; we shall be established forever in the degree of love which we have reached now, in time. If we have attained a high degree of love, we shall be fixed forever in that degree of love and glory; if we possess only a slight degree, that is all we shall have throughout eternity. No further progress will be possible when time has ended. St. Paul urges: "Let us not grow weary in well-doing, for in due season we shall reap if we do not lose heart. So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all men" (Gal 6:9-10). Each passing year is a warning to treasure each present moment and to sanctify it with charity. "We must give each moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it full value in love." (Sister Carmela of the Holy Ghost)

Charity sanctifies every action, even the most trivial and indifferent, and confers upon it a value for eternal life. In fact, "love urges us to live more intensely for Him who died for us and rose again. We strive, therefore, to please the Lord in all things…Thus when we have finished the one and only course of our earthly life, we may merit to enter into the marriage feast with Him and to be numbered among the blessed" (Dogmatic Constitution of the Church). By living in this manner we carry out the divine plan for our soul, and reach that level of love that God expects of us, and with which we shall love and glorify Him for all eternity.

We have only the short day of this earthly life to grow in love and if we wish to derive from it the greatest possible benefit we must apply ourselves not only to doing good works, but to doing them with our whole heart, and with all the generosity of which we are capable, overcoming the inertia and pettiness which always makes us inclined to the least effort. The love will grow immeasurably and we shall be able to give the Lord the beautiful witness of St. Thérèse of the Child Jesus: "Your love…has grown with me and now it is an abyss, he depths of which I cannot fathom."

But what are these good works we must each accomplish? Those which are pointed out to us through the will of God; only these can sanctify. Jesus used to say: I "must work the works of Him who sent me, while it is day. Night comes when no one can work" (John 9:4). This is why He became man: "I have come to do your will, O God" (Heb 10:7); this is why He lived: "Did you not know that I must be in my Father's house?" (Lk 2:49). Life has one single purpose for Jesus, one single obligation: the will of His Father, the interests of His Father, the glory of His Father.

To be one of Jesus' followers means trying to relive His conduct fully, realizing that only one thing matters: "attending to the Father's business." Instead of this, how many times our lives are dispersed in all directions and in so many useless activities, in passing things that disappear with time and only reflect the vanity of the world. Only the time that is dedicated to God and to fulfilling His Will will endure; being fixed in God makes man participate in His immutability. Then the passage of time will not cast a shadow of sadness on our lives, but rather fill our hearts with joy because it brings our eternal meeting with God the closer. Mary each passing year be a step forward toward our true home, and each day be marked with yearning for the Lord: "Come Lord Jesus." (Rev 22:20).

- Divine Intimacy by Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen O.C.D.




Salvete all!

Happy New Year to all! 2016 was quite the year, eh? I hope you all had a very Merry Christmas! :holly: Just a quick life update:

1.) If all goes as planned, this should be my last semester of undergraduate studies. (AND THEN I SHALL AT LAST BE DONE!!!! HOOORAAAY!!!) I'm taking a Watercolor class, a Color Theory class, and some class about "Religions in Dialogue" or something like that to finish up my Minor requirement. We'll see how that goes. I will be very happy to be done and to have some more time to work on art.

2.) In the way of New Years Resolutions, I'm thinking I might try and read St. Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologiae this year. I don't know if I can read it all in a year, but we'll see what happens. It's definitely been on my bucket list of book(s) to read. I'd also like to actually finish William of Tyre's History of Deeds done beyond the Sea but I slowed down tremendously once I started trying to outline and take notes on the whole thing, so I'm only at the part right after they capture Antioch, which is about halfway through the first volume. Gah. 

3.) Finally finished Skyrim's main quest-line after all these years. Very...anti-climactic, though by the time I finished it my character was at, like, level 60 or something. Also finished the Dawnguard DLC but not the Dragonborn one. I'm a little Skyrimed out, but I'll probably go back and finish up that expansion too. 

4.) And a very happy 125th birthday to Professor J.R.R. Tolkien! :w00t!:

5.) My life is exciting, I know. Definitely keeping busy, though it certainly doesn't seem like it much on paper. :XD:

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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My art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to commission me or if you’d like to order prints. I prefer e-mail to notes simply because it’s much easier to keep track of e-mails.

How to Order Prints:
Send me an e-mail that:
:bulletblack: indicates exactly what picture(s) you want
:bulletblack: indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: has your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (and if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

I will then send a confirmation e-mail with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. I've found checks to work out the best. Once I've received the check and it has cleared, I will mail the print(s).

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00

4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x24 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and the postage.

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  • Listening to: "The Litany of the Saints" - Cathedral Singers
  • Reading: History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea
  • Watching: "The Idiot"
  • Playing: Skyrim


"How great is your name, O Lord our God,
through all the earth!

When I see the heavens, the work of your hands,
the moon and the stars which you arranged,
what is man that you should keep him in mind,
mortal man that you care for him?

Yet you have made him little less than a god;
with glory and honor you crowned him,
gave him power over the works of your hands,
put all things under his feet."

- from Psalm 8



Salvete all!

I hope you are all doing well on this great Feast of All Saints! I thought I'd do a quickie update since I haven't posted a journal in a number of months. I'm still alive, still active, but probably more artisticly lethargic than I should be. I have lots of projects lined up, as well as a number of finished works that I haven't gotten a chance to upload yet, simply because it takes a good day of free time to write one of my little "novels" for the saint descriptions. But for those who are curious, these are the saints I have already finished but haven't uploaded. I'll get there someday, I promise!

1.) St. John the Evangelist
2.) St. John the Baptist
3.) St. Dominic
4.) St. Philomena
5.) St. Clare of Assisi
6.) St. Bernard of Clairvaux
7.) St. Louis of France
8.) St. Monica
9.) St. Thomas More
10.) St. Kateri Tekakwitha 
11.) St. John Chrysostom
12.) St. Benedict of Nursia
13.) St. Scholastica

and I'll be making a St. Anthony of Egypt icon sometime soon too. 

I'm actually ready to draw some Templars. I miss those guys, you know? Maybe revisit those comics again. I guess I just feel guilty for working on fun art when I have so much commissioned work to finish up (read: start). :XD: What I really want to do is some sketch portraits of the characters from Henryk Sienkiewicz's With Fire and Sword or maybe do some portraits of the Leaders of the First Crusade. Do you guys even know how long I've been waiting to make a picture of Bohemond?! (Hah, actually, I think I wrote somewhere on that picture of Alexius Comnenus that I made many moons ago about drawing a picture of Bohemond....hahah, that never materialized.)

But I digress. 

So, I will try to be a bit more consistent about posting my artwork up here than I have been. I'm going to see if I can't try and upload one of my finished saint icons up here every week. That should be relatively doable. 

EDIT: Oh, I almost forgot! I also wanted to ask people for pumpkin carving suggestions. I haven't done a pumpkin for this year yet 'cause I've kind of run out of ideas.

Also, does anyone else get shivers down their spine whenever they listen to the Litany of the Saints? Can I just say that I love the Litany of the Saints? I just, I can't even describe it. I get so choked up with tears whenever I listen to it. It's like a combination of feeling the thunderous weight of all of the glory and power and wonder and beauty and triumphs of human history filling the cosmos with unbearable splendor...and then simultaneously being crushed with gratitude because I feel like I'm being loved by the best people who have ever lived...and they're my Family

 

In related news (related to the saints I mean, not my art-output woes), the Office of Readings today for the Feast of All Saints is pretty sweet so I wanted to share it with y'all.



"Why should our praise and glorification, or even the celebration of this feast day mean anything to the saints? What do they care about earthly honors when their heavenly Father honors them by fulfilling the faithful promise of the Son? What does our commendation mean to them? The saints have no need of honor from us; neither does our devotion add the slightest thing to what is theirs. Clearly, if we venerate their memory, it serves us, not them. But I tell you, when I think of them, I feel myself inflamed by a tremendous yearning. 


Calling the saints to mind inspires, or rather arouses in us, above all else, a longing to enjoy their company, so desirable in itself. We long to share in the citizenship of heaven, to dwell with the spirits of the blessed, to join the assembly of patriarchs, the ranks of the prophets, the council of apostles, the great host of martyrs, the noble company of confessors and the choir of virgins. In short, we long to be united in happiness with all the saints. But our dispositions change. The Church of all the first followers of Christ awaits us, but we do nothing about it. The saints want us to be with them, and we are indifferent. The souls of the just await us, and we ignore them.

Come, brothers, let us at length spur ourselves on. We must rise again with Christ, we must seek the world which is above and set our mind on the things of heaven. Let us long for those who are longing for us, hasten to those who are waiting for us, and ask those who look for our coming to intercede for us. We should not only want to be with the saints, we should also hope to possess their happiness. While we desire to be in their company, we must also earnestly seek to share in their glory. Do not imagine that there is anything harmful in such an ambition as this; there is no danger in setting our hearts on such glory. 

When we commemorate the saints we are inflamed with another yearning: that Christ our life may also appear to us as he appeared to them and that we may one day share in his glory. Until then we see him, not as he is, but as he became for our sake. He is our head, crowned, not with glory, but with the thorns of our sins. As members of that head, crowned with thorns, we should be ashamed to live in luxury; his purple robes are a mockery rather than an honor. When Christ comes again, his death shall no longer be proclaimed, and we shall know that we also have died, and that our life is hidden with him. The glorious head of the Church will appear and his glorified members will shine in splendor with him, when he forms this lowly body anew into such glory as belongs to himself, its head. 

Therefore, we should aim at attaining this glory with a wholehearted and prudent desire. That we may rightly hope and strive for such blessedness, we must above all seek the prayers of the saints. Thus, what is beyond our own powers to obtain will be granted through their intercession."

~ from a sermon by St. Bernard of Clairvaux



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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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My art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to commission me or if you’d like to order prints. I prefer e-mail to notes simply because it’s much easier to keep track of e-mails.

How to Order Prints:
Send me an e-mail that:
:bulletblack: indicates exactly what picture(s) you want
:bulletblack: indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: has your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (and if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

I will then send a confirmation e-mail with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. I've found checks to work out the best. Once I've received the check and it has cleared, I will mail the print(s).

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00

4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x24 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and the postage.

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  • Listening to: "Prokeimenon" - Cappella Romana
  • Reading: Aristotle
  • Watching: Gone with the Wind
  • Playing: Medieval II:Total War and Skyrim


"With our whole heart and voice we acclaim You, O God;
we offer You our praise and worship,
Unbegotten Father, Only-Begotten Son,
Holy Spirit, constant friend and guide;
Most Holy and Undivided Trinity, to You be glory for ever."

- Antiphon from Evening Prayer for the Feast of the Holy Trinity

Salvete all!

Happy Feast of the Holy Trinity everyone!!! I hope you are all doing well! I know it has been a long time since I last updated this journal, so I thought now would be a good time to write a quickie journal entry just so everyone knows I'm not dead. 

Quick Theophilia life-update: I'm still in school and probably will be for another year or so because university scheduling stinks. :faint: I just finished my last semester towards the end of April and took some good classes, including Ancient Philosophy, Greek and Roman Art, Roman history, and a Studio Arts class. I think next semester is going to be a bit lighter (because all the art classes are scheduled at the same time on the same days! GRRR). But in the meantime, I'm just going to work and try and enjoy the summer. And maybe finally beat Skyrim. Because that still hasn't happened (but mounted combat evidently is a thing now! Which is why my first game crashed in the first place).

Some big news in our family: one of my older brothers is finally all done and graduated from seminary and will be ordained to the priesthood on June 10th. We're all really excited for him! Please keep him in your prayers! :dance:

And not only is it the Feast of the Holy Trinity, it also happens to be my 25th birthday! Man, am I getting old. That's a 1/4 of a century yo. You guys are awesome. Thank you all for the happy birthday wishes! :aww: Unfortunately I didn't get much time this weekend to hang out with my twin sister (since she has a big-kid job working as a pediatric nurse and all that) but hopefully later this week I'll be able to drive over and see her. :D Because if you're a twin, it's no fun celebrating your birthday without your best friend, otherwise it ends up sounding like a Celine Dion song: [link] 

I also just recently finished a GREAT book called Theology and Sanity by Frank Sheed that I HIGHLY recommend to anyone who has even a smattering of interest in Catholic theology. In fact, in honor of the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity, I'm going to post a snippet from his book which discusses this most important article of faith, which, as the Catechism of the Catholic Church says, is the central mystery of Christian faith and life. "It is the mystery of God in Himself. It is therefore the source of all the other mysteries of faith, the light that enlightens them. It is the most fundamental and essential teaching in the "hierarchy of the truths of faith". (CCC 234).



From Frank Sheed's Theology and Sanity:

The notion is unfortunately widespread that the mystery of the Blessed Trinity is a mystery of mathematics, that is to say, of how one can equal three. The plain Christian accepts the doctrine of the Trinity; the "advanced" Christian rejects it; but too often what is being accepted by the one and rejected by the other is that one equals three. The believer argues that God has said it, therefore it must be true; the rejecter argues it cannot be true, therefore God has not said it. A learned non-Catholic divine, being asked if he believed in the Trinity, answered, "I must confess that the arithmetical aspect of the Deity does not greatly interest me"; and if the learned can think that there is some question of arithmetic involved, the ordinary person can hardly be expected to know any better. 

(i) Importance of the doctrine of the Trinity

Consider what happens when a believer in the doctrine is suddenly called upon to explain it — and note that unless he is forced to, he will not talk about it at all: there is no likelihood of his being so much in love with the principal doctrine of his Faith that he will want to tell people about it. Anyhow, here he is: he has been challenged, and must say something. The dialogue runs something like this:

Believer: "Well, you see, there are three persons in one nature."
Questioner: "Tell me more."
Believer: "Well, there is God the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Spirit."
Questioner: "Ah, I see, three gods."
Believer (shocked): "Oh, no! Only one God."
Questioner: "But you said three: you called the Father God, which is one; and you called the Son God, which makes two; and you called the Holy Spirit God, which makes three."

Here the dialogue form breaks down. From the believer's mouth there emerges what can only be called a soup of words, sentences that begin and do not end, words that change into something else halfway. This goes on for a longer or shorter time. But finally there comes something like: "Thus, you see, three is one and one is three." The questioner not unnaturally retorts that three is not one nor one three. Then comes the believer's great moment. With his eyes fairly gleaming he cries: "Ah, that is the mystery. You have to have faith."

Now it is true that the doctrine of the Blessed Trinity is a mystery, and that we can know it only by faith. But what we have just been hearing is not the mystery of the Trinity; it is not the mystery of anything, it is wretched nonsense. It may be heroic faith to believe it, like the man who
Wished there were four of 'em
That he might believe more of 'em
or it may be total intellectual unconcern - God has revealed certain things about Himself, we accept the fact that He has done so, but find in ourselves no particular inclination to follow it up. God has told us that He is three persons in one Divine nature, and we say "Quite so", and proceed to think of other matters - last week's Retreat or next week's Confession or Lent or Lourdes or the Church's social teaching or foreign missions. All these are vital things, but compared with God Himself, they are as nothing: and the Trinity is God Himself. These other things must be thought about, but to think about them exclusively and about the Trinity not at all is plain folly. And not only folly, but a kind of insensitiveness, almost a callousness, to the love of God. For the doctrine of the Trinity is the inner, the innermost, life of God, His profoundest secret. He did not have to reveal it to us. We could have been saved without knowing that ultimate truth. In the strictest sense it is His business, not ours. He revealed it to us because He loves men and so wants not only to be served by them but truly known. The revelation of the Trinity was in one sense an even more certain proof than Calvary that God loves mankind. To accept it politely and think no more of it is an insensitiveness beyond comprehension in those who quite certainly love God: as many certainly do who could give no better statement of the doctrine than the believer in the dialogue we have just been considering.

How did we reach this curious travesty of the supreme truth about God? The short statement of the doctrine is, as we have heard all our lives, that there are three persons in one nature. But if we attach no meaning to the word person, and no meaning to the word nature, then both the nouns have dropped out of our definition, and we are left only with the numbers three and one, and get along as best we can with these. Let us agree that there may be more in the mind of the believer than he manages to get said: but the things that do get said give a pretty strong impression that his notion of the Trinity is simply a travesty. It does him no positive harm provided he does not look at it too closely; but it sheds no light in his own soul: and his statement of it, when he is driven to make a statement, might very well extinguish such flickering as there may be in others. The Catholic whose faith is wavering might well have it blown out altogether by such an explanation of the Trinity as some fellow Catholic of stronger faith might feel moved to give: and no one coming fresh to the study of God would be much encouraged. 

(ii) "Person" and "Nature"

Let us come now to a consideration of the doctrine of the Blessed Trinity to see what light there is in it for us, being utterly confident that had there been no light for us, God would not have revealed it to us. There would be a rather horrible note of mockery in telling us something of which we can make nothing. The doctrine may be set out in four statements:

In the one divine Nature, there are three Persons - the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

The Father is not the Son, the Son is not the Holy Spirit, the Holy Spirit is not the Father: no one of the Persons is either of the others.

The Father is God, the Son is God, the Holy Spirit is God.

There are not three Gods but one God.

We have seen that the imagination cannot help here. Comparisons drawn from the material universe are a hindrance and no help. Once one has taken hold of this doctrine, it is natural enough to want to utter it in simile and metaphor - like the lovely lumen de lumine, light from light, with which the Nicene Creed phrases the relation of the Son to the Father. But this is for afterward, poetical statement of a truth known, not the way to its knowledge. For that, the intellect must go on alone. And for the intellect, the way into the mystery lies, as we have already suggested, in the meaning of the words "person" and "nature". There is no question of arithmetic involved. We are not saying three persons in one person, or three natures in one nature; we are saying three persons in one nature. There is not even the appearance of an arithmetical problem. It is for us to see what person is and what nature is, and then to consider what meaning there can be in a nature totally possessed by three distinct persons.

The newcomer to this sort of thinking must be prepared to work hard here. It is a decisive stage of our advance into theology to get some grasp of the meaning of nature and the meaning ofperson. Fortunately the first stage of our search goes easily enough. We begin with ourselves. Such a phrase as "my nature" suggests that there is a person, I, who possesses a nature. The person could not exist without his nature, but there is some distinction all the same; for it is the person who possesses the nature and not the other way round.

One distinction we see instantly. Nature answers the question what we are; person answers the question who we are. Every being has a nature; of every being we may properly ask, What is it? But not every being is a person: only rational beings are persons. We could not properly ask of a stone or a potato or an oyster, Who is it? 

By our nature, then, we are what we are. It follows that by our nature we do what we do: for every being acts according to what it is. Applying this to ourselves, we come upon another distinction between person and nature. We find that there are many things, countless things, we can do. We can laugh and cry and walk and talk and sleep and think and love. All these and other things we can do because as human beings we have a nature which makes them possible. A snake could do only one of them - sleep. A stone could do none of them. Nature, then, is to be seen not only as what we are but as the source of what we can do.

But although my nature is the source of all my actions, although my nature decides what kind of operations are possible for me, it is not my nature that does them: I do them, I the person. Thus both person and nature may be considered sources of action, but in a different sense. The person is that which does the actions, the nature is that by virtue of which the actions are done, or, better, that from which the actions are drawn. We can express the distinction in all sorts of ways. We can say that it is our nature to do certain things, but that we do them. We can say that we operate in or according to our nature. In this light we see why the philosophers speak of a person as the center of attribution in a rational nature: whatever is done in a rational nature or suffered in a rational nature or any way experienced in a rational nature is done or suffered or experienced by the person whose nature it is.

Thus there is a reality in us by which we are what we are: and there is a reality in us by which we are who we are. But as to whether these are two really distinct realities, or two levels of one reality, or related in some other way, we cannot see deep enough into ourselves to know with any sureness. There is an obvious difference between beings of whom you can say only what they are and the higher beings of whom you can say who they are as well. But in these latter - even in ourselves, of whom we have a great deal of experience - we see only darkly as to the distinction between the what and the who. Of our nature in its root reality we have only a shadowy notion, and of our self a notion more shadowy still. If someone - for want of something better to say - says: "Tell me about yourself", we can tell her the qualities we have or the things we have done; but of the self that has the qualities and has done the things, we cannot tell her anything. We cannot bring it under her gaze. Indeed we cannot easily or continuously bring it under our own. As we turn our mind inward to look at the thing we call "I", we know that there is something there, but we cannot get it into any focus: it does not submit to being looked at very closely. Both as to the nature that we ourselves have and the person that we ourselves are, we are more in darkness than in light. But at least we have certain things clear: nature says what we are, person says who we are. Nature is the source of our operations, person does them.

Now at first sight it might seem that this examination of the meaning of person and nature has not got us far toward an understanding of the Blessed Trinity. For although we have been led to see a distinction between person and nature in us, it seems clearer than ever that one nature can be possessed and operated in only by one person. By a tremendous stretch, we can just barely glimpse the possibility of one person having more than one nature, opening up to him more than one field of operation. But the intellect feels baffled at the reverse concept of one nature being totally "wielded", much less totally possessed, by more than one person. Now to admit ourselves baffled by the notion of three persons in the one nature of God is an entirely honorable admission of our own limitation; but to argue that because in man the relation of one nature to one person is invariable, therefore the same must be the relation in God, is a defect in our thinking. It is indeed an example of that anthropomorphism, the tendency to make God in the image of man, which we have already seen hurled in accusation at the Christian belief in God.

Let us look more closely at this idea. Man is made in the image and likeness of God. Therefore it is certain that man resembles God. Yet we can never argue with certainty from an image to the original of the image: we can never be sure that because the image is thus and so, therefore the original must be thus and so. A statue may be an extremely good statue of a man. But we could not argue that the man must be a very rigidman, because the statue is very rigid. The statue is rigid, not because the man is rigid, but because stone is rigid. So also with any quality you may observe in an image: the question arises whether that quality is there because the original was like that or because the material of which the image is made is like that. So with man and God. When we learn anything about man, the question always arises whether man is like that because God is like that, or because that is the best that can be done in reproducing the likeness of God in a being created of nothing. Put quite simply, we have always to allow for the necessary scaling down of the infinite in its finite likeness.

Apply this to the question of one person and one nature, which we find in man. Is this relation of one-to-one the result of something in the nature of being, or simply of something in the nature of finite being? With all the light we can get on the meaning of person and of nature even in ourselves, we have seen that there is still much that is dark to us: both concepts plunge away to a depth where the eye cannot follow them. Even of our own finite natures, it would be rash to affirm that the only possible relation is one person to one nature. But of an infinite nature, we have no experience at all. If God tells us that His own infinite nature is totally possessed by three persons, we can have no grounds for doubting the statement, although we may find it almost immeasurably difficult to make any meaning of it. There is no difficulty in accepting it as true, given our own inexperience of what it is to have an infinite nature and God's statement on the subject; there is not difficulty, I say, in accepting it as true; the difficulty lies in seeing what it means. Yet short of seeing some meaning in it, there is no point in having it revealed to us; indeed, a revelation that is only darkness is a kind of contradiction in terms.

(iii) Three Persons - One God

Let us then see what meaning, - that is to say, what light, - we can get from what has been said so far. The one infinite nature is totally possessed by three distinct persons. Here we must be quite accurate: the three persons are distinct, but not separate; and they do not share the divine nature, but each possesses it totally.

At this first beginning of our exploration of the supreme truth about God, it is worth pausing a moment to consider the virtue of accuracy. There is a feeling that it is a very suitable virtue for mathematicians and scientists, but cramping if applied to operations more specifically human. The young tend to despise it as a kind of tidiness, a virtue proper only to the poor-spirited. And everybody feels that it limits the free soul. It is in particular disrepute as applied to religion, where it is seen as a sort of anxious weighing and measuring that is fatal to the impetuous rush of the spirit. But in fact, accuracy is in every field the key to beauty: beauty has no greater enemy than rough approximation. Had Cleopatra's nose been shorter, says Pascal, the face of the Roman Empire and so of the world would have been changed: an eighth of an inch is not a lot: a lover, you would think, would not bother with such close calculation; but her nose was for her lovers the precise length for beauty: a slight inaccuracy would have spoiled everything. It is so in music, it is so in everything: beauty and accuracy run together, and where accuracy does not run, beauty limps.

Returning to the point at which this digression started: we must not say three separate persons, but three distinct persons, because although they are distinct - that is to say, no one of them is either of the others - yet they cannot be separated, for each is what he is by the total possession of the one same nature: apart from that one same nature, no one of the three persons could exist at all. And we must not use any phrase which suggests that the three persons share the Divine Nature. For we have seen that in the Infinite there is utter simplicity, there are no parts, therefore no possibility of sharing. The infinite Divine Nature can be possessed only in its totality. In the words of the Fourth Council of the Lateran, "There are three persons indeed, but one utterly simple substance, essence, or nature."

Summarizing thus far, we may state the doctrine in this way: the Father possesses the whole nature of God as His Own, the Son possesses the whole nature of God as His Own, the Holy Spirit possesses the whole nature of God as His Own. Thus, since the nature of any being decides what the being is, each person is God, wholly and therefore equally with the others. Further, the nature decides what the person can do: therefore, each of the three persons who thus totally possess the Divine Nature can do all the things that go with being God.

All this we find in the Preface for the Mass on the Feast of the Holy Trinity: "Father, all-powerful and ever-living God, ... we joyfully proclaim our faith in the mystery of your Godhead ...: three Persons equal in majesty, undivided in splendor, yet one Lord, one God, ever to be adored in your everlasting glory."

To complete this first stage of our inquiry, let us return to the question which, in our model dialogue above, produced so much incoherence from the believer - if each of the three persons is wholly God, why not three Gods? The reason why we cannot say three Gods becomes clear if we consider what is meant by the parallel phrase, "three men". That would mean three distinct persons, each possessing a human nature. But note that, although their natures would be similar, each would have his own. The first man could not think with the second man's intellect, but only with his own; the second man could not love with the third's will, but only with his own. The phrase "three men" would mean three distinct persons, each with his own separate human nature, his own separate equipment as man; the phrase "three gods" would mean three distinct persons, each with his own separate Divine Nature, his own separate equipment as God. But in the Blessed Trinity, that is not so. The three Persons are God, not by the possession of equal and similar natures, but by the possession of one single nature; they do in fact, what our three men could not do, know with the same intellect and love with the same will. They are three Persons, but they are not three Gods; they are One God. 




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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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My art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to commission me or if you’d like to order prints. I prefer e-mail to notes simply because it’s much easier to keep track of e-mails. 

How to Order Prints:
Send me an e-mail that:
:bulletblack: indicates exactly what picture(s) you want
:bulletblack: indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: has your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (and if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

I will then send a confirmation e-mail with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. I've found checks to work out the best. Once I've received the check and it has cleared, I will mail the print(s).

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00

4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x24 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and the postage.

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  • Listening to: Of the Father's Love Begotten
  • Reading: "Theology for Beginners" - Frank Sheed
  • Watching: Person of Interest
  • Playing: Medieval II:Total War


“Today is born of a Virgin
He who holds the whole creation
in His Hand.
He whose essence none can touch
is bound in swaddling clothes
as a Child.
God, who in the beginning
established the heavens
lies in a manger.
He who rained manna on His people
is fed on milk from His Mother's breast.
The Bridegroom of the Church summons the wisemen.
The Son of the Virgin accepts their gifts.”


- The Christmas Troparion, by Romanos the Melodist
(www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvjiVa…)


Salvete all!

Merry Christmas everyone! I really need to have a decent journal update, seeing as the last one was all the way back in May, but life has been very busy and I just haven’t had the time I’d like to have to write up journal entries. Not that I don’t have material (trust me, I just went through an entire semester of modern and contemporary art history. I have plenty of rant material), I just don’t have time. I thought, however, that I would do an update for Christmas, so I’m recycling one of my old journal entries (from 2010! I can’t believe it’s been that long!) as a Christmas meditation. God bless you all! Enjoy the rest of the Christmas season too, don’t forget, it doesn’t end until the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord (January 10th for the U.S. dioceses). Merry Christmas! :holly:



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Thoughts on the Nativity of Our Lord
A Meditation on Christmas


"His the doom, our's the mirth
When he came down to earth.
Flower of Jesse's tree
Born on earth to save us."

~ "Cantus" by Connie Dover
www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXM47m…


On this day we rejoice and make merry: we celebrate with family and friends, brothers and sisters, we have large dinners and play music and we decorate our houses with festive lights and colors. On this day, the whole world rejoices.

And yet…

Christmas is not about family.

Christmas is not about friends.

It is not about celebrating with loved ones, or taking a well needed holiday from the work-load of careers and classes. Christmas isn't about refreshing oneself in the glimmer and glory of the season, or bathing in the nostalgia of previous, happy years with warm fuzzy feelings by a glowing fire.

And yet…

We rejoice.

We rejoice at the birth of a doomed Child—a Child who has entered into our cold, lonesome, and miserably weary world. This Child is doomed from birth. Even from his first moments in the wretched manger that serves as his first cradle he is marked out for destruction. We rejoice at the birth of a Child who's only destiny is to die the most miserable of deaths as an ignoble criminal—rejected by His own people, and put to death by the ruling foreign power that His followers had thought He had come to destroy. "He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him" (John 1:11).

He came into the world as a failure, destined for failure. Everything about Him proclaims His failure and His weakness. He is born in a stable, into abject poverty, to impoverished parents, born from a despairing, conquered people, born during the darkest, coldest time of the year. His only companions at His birth were barn animals and wretched shepherds.

Who is this mysterious Child? Who is this Infant who does not shun poverty and misery? Who is this One whom angels and shepherds alike adore? "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it…The true light that gives light to everyone was coming into the world. He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him. He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him….The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us" (John 1:1-14). "You have come down from the stars, O King of heaven…" (St. Alphonsus Liguori)

Dark and light. Death and life. There are two forces interplaying here. One is the absence of the other. The degree of evil is to what extent it is absent of good. Dark is the absence of light. But how helpless we are against the darkness. We need that "light which enlightens every man" to guide our path. This light which is the light of men also reveals himself to be the Way, the Truth, and the Light. But we have strayed far, so far, for "this is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil" (John 3:19) and because of this we could not approach the Adorable Godhead. For this, our merciful Lord came down to save His beloved man. To save us He became man, that we might become like God. He robed himself with human vesture that "he might be weak enough to suffer woe" (John Donne). He bound Himself with chains so that He might break ours'. Our doomed God has come to break the fetters that bind us to our sins, He has come to free us from the slavish captivity of our selfishness; He has come to die that we might live.

By His failure He has purchased for us the only victory we needed. God's failure is humanity's victory. His doom is the only cause for our rejoicing. His doom is our pardon, His destruction is our hope, His death is our life. He is our promised ransom.

Mankind rejoices at the birth of this Doomed Child. He has come to confront the powers of darkness, He has stepped into the midst of evil, He does not shy away from it. He comes to us. He comes to us in the midst of our trials, our despair, He comes in the midst of winter when all our hope is dried up. He comes to save us. He is no stranger to the evils of our world. His infant life is endangered from the moment his star arose in the sky. Herod wants Him dead. The slaughter of the infant children in Bethlehem is only testament to the cruelty and depravity of our fallen world.

Who has never felt overwhelmed by the evil in our world? Like a dark tidal wave, or like an oppressive black thundering cloud it blots out the light from our lives. We are easily overwhelmed by it. In it we glimpse that shred of the eternal despair of loveless self-damnation. It is confoundingly terrible. One only needs to read the newspaper or glance at an internet newsfeed nowadays to acquaint oneself with the horrors of wars, of widespread death, destruction and famine. Evil is insurmountable; it entangles and traps us. We are thrown into confusion and despair because of it. Because on our own power, we are utterly powerless against it. We cannot overcome the evil in the world. We are weak. Utterly, helplessly weak. As Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote:

And in despair I bowed my head;
"There is no peace on earth," I said;
"For hate is strong
And mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good will to men."


What could be strong enough to surmount all of the evils of our world? What could conquer our sins? What could destroy our selfishness, our pride, our lusts, our hate, our despair, our fears, and all our pain and weaknesses? What could banish that last enemy of ours, the ancient Death? What does God send us to rescue us from the darkness?

He sends us a Child. A Child who had dwelt forever as Eternal God with the Father and the Spirit beyond all realms of time and space, beyond the void and the short-grasping thoughts of man. The Word whom the universe could not contain became Man in the womb of a humble, simple, pure and holy Virgin. The humble Lamb would defeat Evil dragon through its helplessness. Weakness could overcome evil. "The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it." (John 1:5).

This Baby has conquered death and sin. This Baby is the world's remedy. He is helpless, small, and weak. And He confounds the terrible pride of the reprobate spirits with His humility. What a weak and cowardly thing evil is! It is defeated by the shedding of the blood of the God-man.  "For the foolishness of God is wiser than man's wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than man's strength" (Corinthians 1:25).

The Feast of the Incarnation—this day, the Nativity of Our Lord—is only of any importance because of His Passion and Resurrection. Without the Cross and the Stone, the Star of Bethlehem is meaningless. And yet, we shy away from the Cross. The manger, though poor and humble, at least we can accept. There Christ is small and helpless. There, He makes no demands on our comfort. He is one of us. Do we cry out with the angels at Christmas, "Glory to God in the highest, and peace to men of good will" and then cry out, "Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord"? Do we greet Him with smiles and shouts of joy at the manger and then abandon Him at the cross? Do we cry "Hosanna!" at Christmas and then reject Him with the faithless crowds at the Passover? Are we Christians when it is safe and convenient for us and then run tail when any courage is needed on our part? Are we only followers of Christ when He follows our will?

There is a certain irony in the bad thief's words, "If you are the Son of God, then save yourself, and us." This strikes at the very heart of the Incarnation. The very name of Jesus, which is "Yeshua," means "God saves." The horrendous irony of these words is that they are true, so very true! And yet, the mission of Christ "is to do the will of him who sent me" (John 4:34). But what the thief, and what many of us do not understand, is that our God does not save us within our nice little packaged, pre-conceived notions of salvation. He saves us in the way we actually need saving. We need saving from ourselves. Emmanuel is "God-with-us." And to rescue us from death, He had to plumb the dregs of our despair and anguish so that no one can say, "God does not understand. He has not suffered like I have." What is God's answer to our cries for salvation? He comes. He comes to be with us. God-with-us is just that. He shares our joys and our sorrows. He suffers with us in our misery, and He comforts us in our afflictions.

We needed the death of God to give man life. We killed God. We murdered our Emmanuel. And our Deicide—the most terrible sin, the most outrageous, inconceivable blasphemy—was our redemption. God was born into our world to die at our hands. He came to us, yielding himself to us as a helpless infant. This Child you see here, lying in this cold manger of soaked and sodden hay—Here! Look upon his small and tender hands! Soon they shall be pierced with ruthless iron nails. See this soft, milk-white skin? Soon it shall be bruised and broken and bloody and torn. These tiny feet of His', which curl up against the cold, soon they shall be curled against the wounding wood, the rending nails. His gentle breathing shall turn into the rasping death rattle as He cries out His last breath. His little beating heart shall be shriven through with a lance, His blood-outpouring, dried up body shall be shriveled like myrrh, being completely consumed by the ardor of His Divine Love. Here He is! Pale, sleeping, lying in a manger! Here is a fitting pyre where He shall make His home! He has come to set the world aflame; He shall consume Himself with His Passion. He is ready for the sacrifice like a lamb, He has made His bed of spices and myrrh where He shall be immolated. The Holocaustal offering of this Innocent Phoenix shall enflame the whole world, and the fragrant incense of its burning shall dispel the darkness of our sins.

And while we despise Him, and mock Him, or while we ignore Him and shuffle away indifferent and cold, this King of Martyrs shall open wide His arms for our salvation. While we heap upon Him the brunt of our rage and despair, while we rail and cry out for justice, God's silence shall answer us.

"He was oppressed and afflicted,
  yet he did not open his mouth;
he was led like a lamb to the slaughter,
  and as a sheep before its shearers is silent,
  so he did not open his mouth.
By oppression and judgment he was taken away.
  Yet who of his generation protested?
For he was cut off from the land of the living;
  for the transgression of my people he was punished"

(Isaiah 53:7-8)

Et Homo factus est.
And he became man.

Only the greatest evil could become our greatest hope. Our greatest crime became our greatest salvation. Only by putting to death our Only Hope could we finally be freed of our eternal despair. Evil has recoiled in on itself. The Christian paradox is that our greatest joy comes from the greatest sorrow. Life has triumphed where before there was only hopelessness.

"He destroyed Hades when He descended into it.
He put it into an uproar even as it tasted of His flesh.
Isaiah foretold this when he said,
"You, O Hell, have been troubled by encountering Him below."
 - St. John Chrysostom

"When you see this, your hearts will rejoice" (Isaiah 66:14).

The joy of Christmas is not the warm, comfortable pleasant joy of the home, of being surrounded by loved ones, or basking in the gentle glow of lasting friendships. No.

The joy of Christmas is a profound and deep rejoicing. It is not the joy of a comfortable home. It is the relief of a world at war. It is the joy of the beaten, despairing soldier in the trench who has set his eyes glumly in the mud—fastened to the despair of his own doom—who has nonetheless continued to fight on. It is a joy that is the most unexpected wonder of wonders; as startling a message as it first was to the shepherds in the fields. For when the battle that was surely lost begins to turn, when the war that had ended in terrible rout and ruin is suddenly won, when the enemy who had rejoiced in their vicious victory over mankind is suddenly put to shameful flight—this is the joy of Christmas. For the coming of Christ is like that of the reinforcements that had been hinted at and dreamed of in faint wisps of hope, and had finally, finally come; come victorious from beyond darkest doubt and shadowy ruin. For our ancient foe, that spirit like a prowling lion who had formerly been invincible is routed and annihilated. The Christmas joy is the joy of a soldier's hope. The reinforcements have come. We do not fight this battle alone. Emmanuel, God-is-with-us has finally come and he has not delayed. The battle belongs to the Lord and we emerge victorious. If God is with us then who can stand against us?! Christmas is the sounding of the angel's trumpet: the brazen fan-fare of triumph has been taken up, and the blare of that music fills the world. As St. John Chrysostom says: "…For this day the ancient slavery is ended, the devil confounded, the demons take to flight, the power of death is broken, paradise is unlocked, the curse is taken away, sin is removed from us, error driven out, truth has been brought back, the speech of kindliness diffused, and spreads on every side, a heavenly way of life has been planted on the earth, angels communicate with men without fear, and men now hold speech with angels."

We have seen the glimmer of His banners; we have heard the pounding of His steps. We have heard the thunder of His hosts; we have seen the flashing blaze of His glorious dawn. Christmas is the whisper of hope; it is the hint of Easter. It is the dawn of the Resurrection that foreshadows the Eternal Day. Christ has been born to us as the Morning Star; soon He will break forth from the Tomb as the Sun of Righteousness. Christ has been born for us in the bleak night of the Winter Solstice; His birth heralds the Day of that Eternal Spring when the world will break out in joy at He Who Is the Conqueror of Death. So fight on Poor Knights of Christ! Fight on! The Battle has been won! We must claim our victory!

All Glory, laud and honor, to you O Redeemer King, to whom the lips of children make sweet hosannas ring! O God, all glory be to you!

Emmanuel has come! He has not delayed! O come! O come let us adore him!

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep.
"God is not dead, nor doth he sleep!
The wrong shall fail,
The right prevail,
With peace on earth, good will to men!"




:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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My art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to commission me or if you’d like to order prints. I prefer e-mail to notes simply because it’s much easier to keep track of e-mails. Please note that my

How to Order Prints:
Send me an e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00

4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x24 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and then for the actual postage.

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  • Listening to: Veni Creator Spiritus
  • Reading: "The God who loves you" - Peter Kreeft
  • Playing: Age of Empires II


“Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest,
and in our hearts take up Thy rest;
come with Thy grace and heav'nly aid,
To fill the hearts which Thou hast made.”

- Veni Creator Spiritus (www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQGBMl… )

Salvete all!

I hope you all had a spiritually fruitful Lent and a joyous Easter! I thought I’d just do a quick update of life since it just so happens to be my 24th birthday (AHH! I’M GETTING OLD!!!) and in time for the great Solemnity of Pentecost.

Well, I finished up this past semester and now I’m working on lots of commissions that have been keeping me busy. This summer, I’m sure, will end up being a full one. My summer job will probably be starting soon, so then I’ll have less time to do art, but I need to save up so I can pay for school next semester. I finished reading the collection of essays by Cicero that I’d been working on for a good while. I also managed to finish reading Archbishop Fulton Sheen’s Life of Christ (which was AMAZING). And yesterday I finished H.F.M. Prescott’s The Man on a Donkey, a historical fiction novel set in England around the year 1536 after Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the monasteries. It’s a very good book. A friend recommended it to me a long time ago and I’ve only now finished it.

First big piece of news…in a week I’m going to be headed off to Germany!! YAY! I’ve missed Europe so much and I’ve been wanting to get back ever since before I left Italy. :XD: My brother was just going to go to a strength and conditioning seminar held in Cologne himself, but then his wife was like, “Hey, I want to go to Europe too!” So she invited me and we’re going with her brother and one of my cousins. EEEE! I’m so excited!! I think the plan is to take a train from Cologne to Paris and stay there for a couple days. We’ll only be in Europe for a week, but hey, I’ll take as much time in Europe as I can get! :D We’re still trying to figure out our itinerary, so I’ll let you guys know how the trip went once we get back.

Second (and more important) big piece of news is that my brother Peter was just ordained to the transitional deaconate (which means next year he’ll be ordained a priest) on the 16th!!! We’re all so excited for him! He still can barely believe he’s a deacon now and that he’s got one more year until priesthood. Please keep him in your prayers, if you would! His gave his first homily on the Feast of the Ascension and there’s a podcast available to listen to it, if you’d like. Here’s the link: hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/4/6/a/46a74…

Well, those are the big things that I can think of as way of a quick update. Pentecost is coming up everyone! COME HOLY SPIRIT!

I was also tagged by Zurajanaikatsurada. I don't have time to do the whole tagging thing, but I'll answer her questions:

1. Your favorite book?
Oh gosh, that's a hard one. Ummm...I guess I'll go with The Silmarillion, by J.R.R. Tolkien. 
2. What do you do in your free time?  That is, if you have free time.
Waste my time playing computer games. ;-) 
3. What is your favorite food?
New York Strip steak cooked medium. 
4. Have you ever used the word hippopotomonstrousesquipidaliophobia in a sentence?
Nope.
5. Milk or Dark Chocolate?  Or white chocolate?
Dark Chocolate. 
6. If you had to move to one country, which one would it be?
That's another hard one...hmmm...Ireland maybe? Israel too...if I were feeling adventurous. :D
7. What do you normally have for breakfast?
Two eggs and two slices of toast. Occasionally some fried up potatoes to go along with it. If I'm in a hurry it's a poached egg on a piece of toast.
8. Do you have any pets?
Nope. 
9. If you could own one mythical creature, what would it be?
A dragon would be pretty cool...and that's only assuming you could control it.
10. What is your favorite color?
Prussian blue.
11. What time is it where you live right now?
6:18 P.M. 
12. Do you have a favorite avenger?
Eh...not a big superhero fan. Maybe Tony Stark/Ironman from the movies. 
13. Tea or coffee?
Tea. :D Still have never had a drop of coffee in my life.



Come, Holy Spirit,
send forth the heavenly
radiance of your light.

Come, father of the poor,
come, giver of gifts,
come, light of the heart.

Greatest comforter,
sweet guest of the soul,
sweet consolation.

In labor, rest,
in heat, temperance,
in tears, solace.

O most blessed light,
fill the inmost heart
of your faithful.

Without your grace,
there is nothing in us,
nothing that is not harmful.

Cleanse that which is unclean,
water that which is dry,
heal that which is wounded.

Bend that which is inflexible,
fire that which is chilled,
correct what goes astray.

Give to your faithful,
those who trust in you,
the sevenfold gifts.

Grant the reward of virtue,
grant the deliverance of salvation,
grant eternal joy.


- Veni Sancte Spiritus (www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3oVsU… )


O Come Holy Spirit by Theophilia


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

My art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can send me a note.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine. ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00

4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x24 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and then for the actual postage.

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  • Listening to: Asperges Me
  • Reading: "Life of Christ" - Archbishop Fulton Sheen
  • Playing: Pharaoh/Cleopatra
  • Drinking: Vernors



“Pass through the city, through the midst of Jerusalem, and mark [a tau] on the foreheads of those who grieve and lament over all the abominations practiced within it.” - Ezekiel 9:4

“Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.” - Responsory Psalm

Salvete all!

Happy Ash Wednesday! With this day we officially open up this season of Lent—a time of renewal in our love of God, a time of penance, prayer, and almsgiving. In a word, it is a springtime for the soul—a time of rejuvenation; a time to start afresh. I think this Lent in particular will be a very important one. There’s so much evil in the world, and the darkness only seems to be growing thicker and darker. It is no longer simply looming on the horizon, now it is converging and blackening the whole sky. I’ve got the feeling (and I’m sure others feel it) that something big is about to happen. For all I know, this might be the last “normal” Lent. Who knows what’s on the horizon? Wars, economic collapse, perhaps something far worse than ever the Great Depression and World Wars were. Only God knows. However, for me, this thought that something big is “about to go down” more energizes me than depresses me. A huge spiritual battle is taking place in the hearts of everyone alive, and upon the whole world stage. The lines are being drawn up, and it’s up to us to choose our side. I think the recent terrorist attacks and all of the other evils going on in the world have only been tremors of a larger earthquake. “For we fight not against flesh and blood, but against principalities and powers, against the ruler of the world of darkness, against the spirits of evil in high places…” (Eph. 6:12). In any case, whatever happens in the world, we ought always to be prepared for death, which is on the horizon of every soul. How do we prepare for death? By living WELL. By doing God’s will. This is what Lent has always been about: re-orienting ourselves to God, repenting when we fall, and never lagging in trust in God’s great mercy and love for us. We get more wearied asking God for forgiveness than God will ever tire of giving it.

All the evil and darkness in the world ought to spur us on to greater efforts in returning to the Lord and fighting this spiritual battle with the weapons of light. We can be the army that God uses to save the world, but we have to be loyal soldiers of the Cross, and to do that, we have to carry our own cross after our Captain and our King. In G.K. Chesterton’s great epic poem The Ballad of the White Horse, he has Our Lady saying this to King Alfred:
        
     "The men of the East may spell the stars,
         And times and triumphs mark,
         But the men signed of the cross of Christ
         Go gaily in the dark.

         "The men of the East may search the scrolls
         For sure fates and fame,
         But the men that drink the blood of God
         Go singing to their shame.

         "The wise men know what wicked things
         Are written on the sky,
         They trim sad lamps, they touch sad strings,
         Hearing the heavy purple wings,
         Where the forgotten seraph kings
         Still plot how God shall die.

         "The wise men know all evil things
         Under the twisted trees,
         Where the perverse in pleasure pine
         And men are weary of green wine
         And sick of crimson seas.

         "But you and all the kind of Christ
         Are ignorant and brave,
         And you have wars you hardly win
         And souls you hardly save.

         "I tell you naught for your comfort,
         Yea, naught for your desire,
         Save that the sky grows darker yet
         And the sea rises higher.

         "Night shall be thrice night over you,
         And heaven an iron cope.
         Do you have joy without a cause,
         Yea, faith without a hope?"


Indeed, the battle between Heaven and Hell takes place in each individual soul. We must examine our consciences. We must ask ourselves: how have I failed the world? How have I failed my brothers and sisters? How have I failed the Lord? We must not say: “This is what is wrong with the world.” No. We must say: “I am what’s wrong with the world.” If I was a saint, if I was what God meant for me to be, I would set the world on fire (in the words of St. Catherine of Siena). I would do such incalculable good for the whole world at large if I were only a saint. But I am not, and because I am not, I have wounded the world, all of my brothers and sisters, and everyone around me (for no man is an island), and most of all, myself. So, the question we must ask ourselves this Lent is: “What is it that keeps me from being a saint?”

But that is not where we should end. It is one thing to recognize that one has done great evil, it is another to be contrite and repentant. The first, without recourse to God’s mercy, turns only into despair. We must first realize our guilt, and second, we must then abandon ourselves completely to the great mercy of God, which never fails. We must kill our pride and realize that we are not as good as think we are, or as good as we ought to be. Then we must kill pride again when it tries to turn us to despair, and instead we must have absolute confidence in the love of God. There is no sin that God cannot forgive, except for the sin that refuses to be forgiven. If pride again tries to discourage us and drag us down, let us again have recourse to God, and ask Him fro His help. Grace is the very life of God. Only God can supply us with His very own Life (Grace) to be like Him. If we lack in Faith, let us go to God to seek it. If we lack in Hope, or Love, let us again go to Him to seek it. If we lack any virtue, or struggle with any vice—there is the Lord Himself at hand to help us when we ask. The Mother of God, the entire heavenly court of angels and the Triumphant Saints in Heaven and our own Guardian Angels are here to help us in the battle. Christ Himself struggled against the temptations of the devil in the desert. He warred against the Flesh, the World, and the Devil. And He won. And then He won most completely when He trampled on Death by Death through His Resurrection. The Lord Jesus wants us to share in His victory with Him. Let us fight to the death for Truth, and the Lord God will do battle for us.

If you haven’t done so already, St. Louis de Montfort’s Consecration to Jesus through Mary is a great way to prepare for Lent and Easter. The preparation for Consecration begins this Friday, on February 20th, until the actual consecration date March 25th, the Feast of the Annunciation. This site shows how to do that: www.fisheaters.com/totalconsec…

Greek Orthodox Church Interior by Marahuta

“You are dust, and to the dust you shall return” (Genesis 3:19). These words were spoken for the first time by God to Adam as a consequence of his sin, and are repeated by the Church to every Christian to remind him of three fundamental truths: his nothingness, his status as sinner, and the reality of death.

Dust, the ashes which the priest puts on our foreheads today, has no substance; the lightest breath will disperse it. It is a good representation of man’s nothingness: “Lord…my lifetime is as nothing in your sight” (Psalm 33:5), exclaims the Psalmist. Our pride needs to be broken before this truth! In ourselves, we are not only nothing, we are also sinners, who make use of the very gifts of God to offend Him. Today, the Church calls upon us, her children, to bow our heads to receive the ashes as a sign of humility, imploring pardon for our sins; at the same time she reminds us that as punishment for our offenses, we must one day return to dust.

Sin and death are the bitter and inseparable fruits of man’s rebellion against God. “God did not make death” (Wisdom 1:13); it came into the world through sin; and the sad “wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23). Created by God for life, joy, and holiness, we bear in ourselves an eternal seed; therefore we cannot but suffer in the face of sin and death which threaten to impede us in the attainment of our goal, and hence, in the full realization of our being. Yet the Church’s invitation to reflect upon these painful truths is not intended to dishearten us by a pessimistic view of life, but rather to open our hearts to repentance and hope. If Adam’s disobedience introduced sin and death into the world, Christ’s obedience brought their remedy. Lent prepares us to celebrate the paschal mystery which is precisely the mystery through which Christ saves us from sin and from eternal death, while it converts physical death into the way to true life, to beatific and never-ending communion with God. Sin and death are conquered by Christ’s death and resurrection: we shall share in his victory in proportion as we share in His death and resurrection.

“Thus says the Lord: ‘Return to me with all your heart, with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning; and rend your hearts and not your garments’”(Joel 2:12-13). The essential element in conversion is really heartfelt contrition: a heart broken and mortified in its repentance for sin. Sincere repentance, in fact, includes the desire to amend one’s life, and leads in practice to such an attainment. No one is exempt from this obligation: all of us, even the most virtuous, always need conversion; this is, we need to turn to God more completely and more fervently, and to overcome the weaknesses and frailties which lessen our total orientation toward Him.

Lent is the traditional time for this spiritual renewal: “Now is the acceptable time...now is the day of salvation” (2 Corinthians 6:2), notes St. Paul; each of us should make it a decisive moment in the history of our own personal salvation. “We beseech you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God,” he insists, and adds: “we entreat you not to accept the grace of God in vain” (2 Corinthians 5:20; 6:1). It is not only the soul in mortal sin that needs to be reconciled with the Lord; every lack of generosity or of faithfulness to grace hinders intimate friendship with God, chills our relations with Him, and is a rejection of Hid love; all of this requires penance, conversion and reconciliation.

In the Gospel (Matthew 6:1, 6-18), Jesus Himself points out the chief means of sustaining the work of conversion: almsgiving, prayer, fasting; and He insists on the part our interior dispositions play in making these effective: “Almsgiving atones for sins” (Sirach 3:30) but only when done with a sincere desire to please God and to relieve someone in need—not from a desire for praise. Prayer unites man with God and implores His grace when it pours forth from the depths of the heart, but not when reduced to vain ostentation or empty words. Fasting is a sacrifice which pleases God and atones for our faults, provided this mortification of our body is accompanied by the much more important mortification of self-love. Only then, Jesus concludes by saying, “your Father who sees in secret will reward you” (Matthew 6:4, 6:18), that is, He will forgive your sins and grant you ever increasing grace.

- from Divine Intimacy by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen O.C.D.
The holy land 2 by O-N

“Thus says the Lord God:
Cry out full-throated and unsparingly,
lift up your voice like a trumpet blast;
Tell my people their wickedness,
and the house of Jacob their sins.

They seek me day after day,
and desire to know my ways,
Like a nation that has done what is just
and not abandoned the law of their God;
They ask me to declare what is due them,
pleased to gain access to God.
“Why do we fast, and you do not see it?
afflict ourselves, and you take no note of it?”

Lo, on your fast day you carry out your own pursuits,
and drive all your laborers.
Yes, your fast ends in quarreling and fighting,
striking with wicked claw.
Would that today you might fast
so as to make your voice heard on high!
Is this the manner of fasting I wish,
of keeping a day of penance:
That a man bow his head like a reed,
and lie in sackcloth and ashes?
Do you call this a fast,
a day acceptable to the Lord?

This, rather, is the fasting that I wish:
releasing those bound unjustly,
untying the thongs of the yoke;
Setting free the oppressed,
breaking every yoke;
Sharing your bread with the hungry,
sheltering the oppressed and the homeless;
Clothing the naked when you see them,
and not turning your back on your own.

Then your light shall break forth like the dawn,
and your wound shall quickly be healed;
Your vindication shall go before you,
and the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard.
Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer,
you shall cry for help, and he will say: Here I am!

If you remove from your midst oppression,
false accusation and malicious speech;
If you bestow your bread on the hungry
and satisfy the afflicted;
Then light shall rise for you in the darkness,
and the gloom shall become for you like midday;

Then the Lord will guide you always
and give you plenty even on the parched land.
He will renew your strength,
and you shall be like a watered garden,
like a spring whose water never fails.
The ancient ruins shall be rebuilt for your sake,
and the foundations from ages past you shall raise up;
“Repairer of the breach,” they shall call you,
“Restorer of ruined homesteads.”

- Isaiah 58:1-12




Grant, O Lord,
that we may begin with holy fasting this campaign of Christian service,
so that, as we take up battle against spiritual evils,
we may be armed with weapons of self-restraint.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


Holy Land 61 by erene33


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

My art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can send me a note.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine. ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00
(except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2x3 (Wallet) - $1.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x24 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and then for the actual postage.

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  • Listening to: O Come, O Come Emmanuel
  • Reading: "On the Good Life" - Cicero
  • Playing: Age of Mythology
  • Eating: Cinnamon Graham Crackers
  • Drinking: Tea



Salvete All!

Happy Fourth Sunday of Advent! I hope everyone has had a good Advent thus far! I know mine has been busy (especially this past week, finishing up with finals and doing lots of Christmas shopping). I wanted to thank you guys for your prayers for my eyes. They seem to be doing a bit better. I did go to an eye doctor to get them checked out but he only told me that I might have dry eyes. The migraines have decreased somewhat too, so that’s been good. Again, thank you to everyone who offered up some prayers for me! I really appreciate it! :aww:

I’m sorry my journal updates haven’t been particularly profound or very spiritually enriching of late. I was looking back at some of my older past journals and I think I just did a better job in general keeping up with things. Anyway, today I want to share some beautiful readings with you guys. These both come from the Church’s Office of the Readings and I’ve found these to be particularly beautiful and moving, especially since our readings at Mass today had to do with the Annunciation and David’s desire to build a temple for the Lord. I hope you guys enjoy them too. Merry Christmas everyone! God bless you! :holly:

Annunciation by Meldelen


“You have heard, O Virgin, that you will conceive and bear a son; you have heard that it will not be by man but by the Holy Spirit. The angel awaits an answer; it is time for him to return to God who sent him. We too are waiting, O Lady, for your word of compassion; the sentence of condemnation weighs heavily upon us.

The price of our salvation is offered to you. We shall be set free at once if you consent. In the eternal Word of God we all came to be, and behold, we die. In your brief response we are to be remade in order to be recalled to life.

Tearful Adam with his sorrowing family begs this of you, O loving Virgin, in their exile from Paradise. Abraham begs it, David begs it. All the other holy patriarchs, your ancestors, ask it of you, as they dwell in the country of the shadow of death. This is what the whole earth waits for, prostrate at your feet. It is right in doing so, for on your word depends comfort for the wretched, ransom for the captive, freedom for the condemned, indeed, salvation for all the sons of Adam, the whole of your race.

Answer quickly, O Virgin. Reply in haste to the angel, or rather through the angel to the Lord. Answer with a word, receive the Word of God. Speak your own word, conceive the divine Word. Breathe a passing word, embrace the eternal Word.

Why do you delay, why are you afraid? Believe, give praise, and receive. Let humility be bold, let modesty be confident. This is no time for virginal simplicity to forget prudence. In this matter alone, O prudent Virgin, do not fear to be presumptuous. Though modest silence is pleasing, dutiful speech is now more necessary. Open your heart to faith, O blessed Virgin, your lips to praise, your womb to the Creator. See, the desired of all nations is at your door, knocking to enter. If he should pass by because of your delay, in sorrow you would begin to seek him afresh, the One whom your soul loves. Arise, hasten, open. Arise in faith, hasten in devotion, open in praise and thanksgiving. Behold the handmaid of the Lord, she says, be it done to me according to your word.

- In Praise of the Virgin Mother, by St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Virgen de la Esperanza by Meldelen


“When the angel revealed his message to the Virgin Mary he gave her a sign to win her trust. He told her of the motherhood of an old and barren woman to show that God is able to do all that he wills.

When she hears this Mary sets out for the hill country. She does not disbelieve God’s word; she feels no uncertainty over the message or doubt about the sign. She goes eager in purpose, dutiful in conscience, hastening for joy.

Filled with God, where would she hasten but to the heights? The Holy Spirit does not proceed by slow, laborious efforts. Quickly, too, the blessings of her coming and the Lord’s presence are made clear: as soon as Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting the child leapt in her womb, and she was filled with the Holy Spirit.

Notice the contrast and the choice of words. Elizabeth is the first to hear Mary’s voice, but John is the first to be aware of grace. She hears with the ears of the body, but he leaps for joy at the meaning of the mystery. She is aware of Mary’s presence, but he is aware of the Lord’s: a woman aware of a woman’s presence, the forerunner aware of the pledge of our salvation. The women speak of the grace they have received while the children are active in secret, unfolding the mystery of love with the help of their mothers, who prophesy by the spirit of their sons.

The child leaps in the womb; the mother is filled with the Holy Spirit, he fills his mother with the same Spirit. John leaps for you, and the spirit of Mary rejoices in her turn. When John leaps for joy Elizabeth is filled with the Holy Spirit, but we know that though Mary’s spirit rejoices she does not need to be filled with the Holy Spirit. Her son, who is beyond our understanding, is active in his mother in a way beyond our understanding. Elizabeth is filled with the Holy Spirit after conceiving John, while Mary is filled with the Holy Spirit before conceiving the Lord. Elizabeth says: Blessed are you because you have believed.

You also are blessed because you have heard and believed. A soul that believes both conceives and brings forth the Word of God and acknowledges his works.

Let Mary’s soul be in each of you to proclaim the greatness of the Lord. Let her spirit be in each to rejoice in the Lord. Christ has only one mother in the flesh, but we all bring forth Christ in faith. Every soul receives the Word of God if only it keeps chaste, remaining pure and free from sin, its modesty undefiled. The soul that succeeds in this proclaims the greatness of the Lord, just as Mary’s soul magnified the Lord and her spirit rejoiced in God her Savior. In another place we read: Magnify the Lord with me. The Lord is magnified, not because the human voice can add anything to God but because he is magnified within us. Christ is the image of God, and if the soul does what is right and holy, it magnifies that image of God, in whose likeness it was created and, in magnifying the image of God, the soul has a share in its greatness and is exalted.”

- from a commentary on Luke by Saint Ambrose

Virgin Mary pregnant! by teopa


Beginning on the 17th of December, the Church begins to use the seven “O Antiphons” during Evening Prayer on the days preceding Christmas, calling on the Lord Jesus to hasten quickly and come to His people by invoking a number of His great Messianic titles. These are:

December 17th - O Sapientia (O Wisdom)
December 18th - O Adonai (O Lord)
December 19th - O Radix Jesse (O Root of Jesse)
December 20th - O Clavis David (O Key of David)
December 21st - O Oriens (O Rising Sun)
December 22nd - O Rex Gentium (O King of the Nations)
December 23rd - O Emmanuel )(“God with us)

If one starts with the last title and takes the first letter of each one - Emmanuel, Rex, Oriens, Clavis, Radix, Adonai, Sapientia - the Latin words ERO CRAS are formed, meaning, "Tomorrow, I will come." Therefore, the Lord Jesus, whose coming we have prepared for in Advent and whom we have addressed in these seven Messianic titles, now speaks to us, "Tomorrow, I will come." So the "O Antiphons" not only bring intensity to our Advent preparation, but bring it to a joyful conclusion."


Maranatha! Come Lord Jesus!

The Census in Bethlem by Meldelen


:floating: :holly: :floating: :holly: :floating: :holly: :floating: :holly: :floating:

:bulletpurple: The first purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Hope. :floating:
:bulletpurple: The second purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Love. :heart:
:bulletpink: The third rose candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Joy. :dance:
:bulletpurple: The fourth purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Peace. :aww:


:holly: :floating: :holly: Advent Wreath :holly: :floating: :holly:

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:snowflake: :flame::flame::flame::flame: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:holly: :holly: :holly: :holly: :holly: :holly:

:floating: :holly: :floating: :holly: :floating: :holly: :floating: :holly: :floating:
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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can send me a note.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine. ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $4.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $1.00
4x6 - $5.00
4x8 - $7.00
5x7 - $8.00
6x8 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00
8x12 - $25.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $8.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
8x20 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x20 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and then for the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

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  • Listening to: Chrystus wodzem Chrystus Królem
  • Reading: "History of the Church" - Eusebius
  • Playing: Age of Mythology
  • Eating: Cinnamon Graham Crackers
  • Drinking: Tea

Blessed Jesus - Mosaic in the Duomo - Monreale by skarzynscy

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Happy Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe!

“Jesus answered, ‘My kingship is not of this world; if my kingship were of this world, my servants would fight, that I might not be handed over to the Jews; but my kingship is not from this world.’ Pilate said to him, ‘So you are a king?’ Jesus answered, ‘You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I have come into this world, to bear witness to the truth. Every one who is of the truth hears my voice.’” (John 18:36-37)

I haven’t updated my journal in months, so I thought it was about time, especially since this Feast marks the close of the liturgical year and the approach of the Advent season. So…well, where do I start? It’s been quite a busy year. I’m still in college (and it looks like I’ll be in college for 2 and half more years. :faint: Gah….) and right now I’m taking classes for an Art degree. I’m also taking Latin (YAY! :excited: ) which I’ve been wanting to take for forever. So that’s exciting. I’ve been reading a lot of books too (War and Peace was the big one, that took me about a month), made some money working at my summer job, transferred to a new university (which depleted all the money I made during the summer and more :( ) and I have been getting some art and commissions done here and there as well. And….I think that pretty much sums up my life. Terribly exciting stuff, I know. ;-)

Oh, and if you all could spare some prayers, I’m having some vision/headache (perhaps migraine) issues which have been making it difficult for me to get much art done. This journal will have to be pretty short because of that (though I feel like I owe you guys a long one). I'm gonna try and get an eye appointment sometime this week, but in the meantime I'll just have to power-through these headaches. ;-) So, any prayers would be appreciated! Thank you! And thank you guys for being such faithful watchers! I’ll try an update the journal more frequently, and maybe I’ll even get around to writing that journal about my Rome trip that I promised (spoiler: it was pretty awesome. I love Europe. YAY OLD THINGS!)

Christ by elliegreco

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can send me a note.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine. ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $4.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $1.00
4x6 - $5.00
4x8 - $7.00
5x7 - $8.00
6x8 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00
8x12 - $25.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $8.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
8x20 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x20 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and then for the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

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  • Listening to: All Glory, Laud and Honor - Richard Proulx
  • Reading: "Those Terrible Middle Ages" - Regine Pernoud
  • Watching: Granada's Sherlock Holmes
  • Playing: Pharaoh and Cleopatra
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All glory, laud, and honor 
to you, Redeemer, King, 
to whom the lips of children 
made sweet hosannas ring. 
You are the King of Israel 
and David's royal Son, 
now in the Lord's name coming, 
the King and Blessed One. 

The company of angels 
is praising you on high; 
and we with all creation 
in chorus make reply. 
The people of the Hebrews 
with palms before you went; 
our praise and prayer and anthems 
before you we present. 

To you before your passion 
they sang their hymns of praise; 
to you, now high exalted, 
our melody we raise. 
As you received their praises, 
accept the prayers we bring, 
for you delight in goodness, 
O good and gracious King! 

Palm Sunday by RadoJavor

Salvete all!
 
Happy Passion (Palm) Sunday! I hope you are enjoying this first day of Holy Week. May this last week of Lent, culminating in the great and Holy Easter Triduum, be an opportunity for an ever-greater outpouring of grace. May we find ourselves at Easter filled with the joy of the Lord's glorious Resurrection. First the ignominy and poverty of the Cross, then the great and majestic Resurrection. 

I hope you have all been doing well! We've been enjoying some uncommonly nice weather here (it's about 73 degrees right now, and humid! Though...I think we're about to get a really big thunderstorm, and the temperature will plummet to about 25. Hah. One last cold blast and then hopefully it'll really be spring). 
I just finished reading: David Copperfield by Charles Dickens on Friday, I got Chesterton's St. Francis of Assisi done about a week or so ago, and I just finished Herald of Divine Love by St. Gertrude the Great today. :aww:

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However, the most exciting thing that's going on in my life right now is: I'M GOING TO ROME!!! ISN'T THAT CRAZY??!! I'm actually going to be in Europe! ME! IN EUROPE! EUROPE!!!! Like, the continent on which pretty much everything I love IS. EUROPE. LIKE WHERE ALL THE HISTORY OF EVERYTHING COOL AND AWESOME EVER HAPPENED EVER. Like, WHERE ALL THE FAMOUS AND AWESOME AND AMAZING PEOPLE WHO SHAPED WESTERN CIVILIZATION FOR ALL TIME LIVED. AND I'M GOING TO BE THERE TOO. ME. I'M GOING TO, IN SOME SMALL WAY, HAVE A PARTICIPATION IN THAT SPACE HALLOWED BY MARTYRS, LAUDED BY THE GREATEST POETS, AND RULED BY THE GREATEST OF EMPIRES. I WILL BE A PART OF THAT GREAT MASS OF HUMANITY WHO HAS BREATHED THE SAME AIR AND REPOSED IN THE SAME LAND. I AM GOING TO BE IN THE SAME PLACE WHERE MILLIONS UPON MILLIONS OF HISTORY'S GREATEST PEOPLE HAVE LIVED AND WORKED. THE EUROPE THAT HAS BUILDINGS OLDER THAN MY COUNTRY. EUROPE. AHHHHH!! AND: SO. MUCH. HISTORY. I'm so excited that I still don't really believe it's happening. The first time it sort of hit me was a couple nights ago when I had a dream that I was boarding the plane and I had forgotten everything. I was in quite a state, let me tell you. ;-) But: I'M GOING TO ROME!!!

I still can't fathom that. Rome. The Rome of the early Republic. Rome of the Seven Hills. The Rome of Caesar. The City of Gold and Marble. Capital of the Roman Empire. Queen of Cities, Queen of Empires. The Eternal City. Rome of the Emperors. The City that ruled over the whole world. Rome of the early Christians. Resting place of Saints Peter and Paul. City made holy by the martyrs. City governed by saints. City of the Popes. City of the Mother-Church. The Rome that has endured through wars, conquests, famines, earthquakes, plagues, more wars, sieges, fires, natural disasters and untold devastation and destruction. The same Rome. The Eternal City. Rome.

If I say it often enough maybe it'll finally sink in. 

So I'm going to be in Rome (ROME! AH!) for the canonizations of the blesseds John XXIII and John Paul II at St. Peter's Basilica on Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27th, 2014. I'm going to be there during the preceding week (so, the Octave of Easter, i.e. Easter Week). I'm on a particular tour, so it's very scheduled (which I think is actually a very good thing). We're going to be flying there on Monday. On Tuesday (April 22nd) we're going to be touring the sites from the Ancient Roman period (the Colosseum, Pantheon, Mamertine Prison, the Forum, etc.). Wednesday will be St. Peter's Basilica and the Vatican Museums; Thursday we'll be going to Orvieto; Friday we'll be in Assisi; Saturday we'll be at Castel Gandolfo, and in the afternoon we'll have some free time for the exploration of Rome. Sunday is when the canonizations take place, and after that there will be more free time. Then we're leaving Italy on Monday (on a long flight home).

I already have a number of churches I want to see, but since our schedule is pretty tight, I'm sure I won't see all of them. But that's okay. My top list is as follows: 1.) St. John Lateran, 2.) St. Cecilia in Trastevere, 3.) Sancta Maria sopra Minerva, 4.) St. Alphonsus Liguori. (I suppose I'm fortunate in that I really want to see all of the gothic churches in Rome and there really are very few of them. So that's my top "extras" list).

Some of you may think I'm being excessively excited, but I tell you most solemnly that I still don't feel that I'm doing this trip to Rome justice. I wish I could appreciate it more than I do, and I hope I can stir myself to be even more excited. I want to be able to take advantage of this wonderful and rare opportunity; it would be a real crime to squander it, and I certainly don't want to do that. I think I'm going to spend a good bit of time this week trying to prepare for this trip, for which end I am posting these travel plans in the hopes of soliciting some advice from those who are much more travel-experienced than I am.

This will actually be my first time ever being on a plane, so that should be interesting. I really don't know how long the flight will be, though I got some estimates ranging from about 11-14 hours. So we'll see. Travel, I'm sure, will take pretty much all day. Therefore, I'm going to try and equip myself with a whole lot of reading materials for the trip. I have a mortal dread of sitting around and having nothing to do. ;-)

Does anyone have advice for what kinds of things to bring? Or sites I should be sure to hit in Rome? Should I bring a backpack and some little sketch pads? Any little quirky odd things I ought to know about traveling around Rome or Italy beforehand?

I'd really appreciate any tips people could give me. BohemianBeachcomber gave me a number of useful tips already, but more would certainly be welcome. :)

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Path of the King by Aranthulas

From a sermon by Saint Andrew of Crete, bishop

"Let us go together to meet Christ on the Mount of Olives. Today he returns from Bethany and proceeds of his own free will toward his holy and blessed passion, to consummate the mystery of our salvation. He who came down from heaven to raise us from the depths of sin, to raise us with himself, we are told in Scripture, above every sovereignty, authority and power, and every other name that can be named, now comes of his own free will to make his journey to Jerusalem. He comes without pomp or ostentation. As the psalmist says: He will not dispute or raise his voice to make it heard in the streets. He will be meek and humble, and he will make his entry in simplicity.

Let us run to accompany him as he hastens toward his passion, and imitate those who met him then, not by covering his path with garments, olive branches or palms, but by doing all we can to prostrate ourselves before him by being humble and by trying to live as he would wish. Then we shall be able to receive the Word at his coming, and God, whom no limits can contain, will be within us.

In his humility Christ entered the dark regions of our fallen world and he is glad that he became so humble for our sake, glad that he came and lived among us and shared in our nature in order to raise us up again to himself. And even though we are told that he has now ascended above the highest heavens—the proof, surely, of his power and godhead—his love for man will never rest until he has raised our earthbound nature from glory to glory, and made it one with his own in heaven.

So let us spread before his feet, not garments or soulless olive branches, which delight the eye for a few hours and then wither, but ourselves, clothed in his grace, or rather, clothed completely in him. We who have been baptized into Christ must ourselves be the garments that we spread before him. Now that the crimson stains of our sins have been washed away in the saving waters of baptism and we have become white as pure wool, let us present the conqueror of death, not with mere branches of palms but with the real rewards of his victory. Let our souls take the place of the welcoming branches as we join today in the children’s holy song: Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Blessed is the king of Israel."

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can send me a note.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine. ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $1.00
4x6 - $5.00
4x8 - $7.00
5x7 - $8.00
6x8 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00
8x12 - $25.00 

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14 - $35.00
12x18 - $50.00
8x20 - $50.00
16x20 - $65.00
18x20 - $90.00
20x30 - $110.00
24x36 - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of purchasing the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) and mailers in which to ship your item, and then for the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppes– Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
5. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
6. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
7. The Decameron– Boccaccio
8. Woman - Edith Stein
9. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
10. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
11. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
12. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy

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  • Listening to: Crux Fidelis
  • Reading: "David Copperfield" - Charles Dickens
  • Watching: BBC Anna Karenina
  • Playing: Pharaoh
:snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake: :shamrock: :snowflake:

Church St. Joseph by stengchen

Salvete all!
 
“God has made me a father to the King and master of all His household.  
He has raised me up, that He might save many people.”
- Responsory from the Office of St. Joseph
 
Happy Solemnity of St. Joseph, the Husband of Mary and the Foster-Father of Jesus Christ! Well, it’s certainly been an interesting start to the year. I haven’t been able to get out as much artwork as I would like, so I really need to work on that. I was hoping Lent would give me the opportunity to rid myself of a number of my distractions so I can do more artwork, but unfortunately, I am my own source of distraction, and will use other things as a means to distract myself unless I really kick the lazy in the butt. ;-) I have a number of projects I’ve been working on, and hopefully those will get done soon. I’ve also, rather unfortunately, had to start watermarking my artwork. I’ve had a number of people suggest that I do so, since I’ve had some problems in the past with people using my artwork without permission. Thankfully it hasn’t happened very much, but still, I figured I probably ought to, even if I dislike watermarks. The new dA watermarks aren’t too obtrusive so it shouldn’t be too bad. Sorry everyone about that. :hmm:
 
I feel like I haven’t done too much since last I updated. As I said, I have a number of artworks sitting around, unfinished, on my desk (it seems I haven’t been able to do too much art), but I have gotten a number of books read. During the month of February I was working part-time at a desk job doing some very boring (but very necessary) work. Fortunately, the nature of the job was such that I could listen to audiobooks while I worked without it interfering with doing my job. So actually it was rather fun to go into work, listen to a book all day, get paid for it, and then go home. :D I only listened to shorter books (the ones available averaged about 7-8 hours) and so I read: Treasure Island, The Secret Garden (I can’t believe I had never read that one before, I really, really liked it. :nod:), A Little Princess, The Hound of the Baskervilles (the only Sherlock Holmes I hadn’t read before, interestingly enough), and The Wizard of Oz (which was dull and tedious). I started some other books, but I never managed to finish them. Tom Sawyer was one. I liked Mark Twain’s writing style well enough, but I wasn’t sufficiently engaged to get through all of it. I hated Alice in Wonderland. I got about two thirds through it and wondered why I bothered. I suppose non-sensical literature just doesn’t appeal to me. I didn’t see the purpose to the story (I’m not sure if there really is one), and it didn’t amuse me (which, if it had a purpose, was probably what it was supposed to do), so I gave up reading it. I also started Robinson Crusoe, but the writing style irked me, and I didn’t get very far.
 
Those were the audiobooks. Back in January and February I “binged” on Alfred Duggan, a historical fiction writer I’ve come to like very much. I checked out all the books from the library by him that I could get a hold of and read them all. I had read his book Count Bohemond a couple summers ago, and I had enjoyed it. So I started with Knight with Armor (a book about the First Crusade), The Lady for Ransom (about a group of Norman mercenaries fighting their way through Asia Minor in the wake of the Battle of Manzikert), Leopards and Lilies (about the wife of Sir Falkes de Breauté, and ending with the siege of Bedford Castle) and The Falcon and the Dove (a biographical sketch of the life and times of St. Thomas Becket). All quite enjoyable. I like his writing style very much, and of course, I am quite partial to the time periods he picks. He also does a very good job of conveying the feel of the period without being either overly sentimental or crude and brutish; the first being the Victorian fashion, the latter being the fashion nowadays (when somehow realism = “gritty”, ie, over-sensationalized: crass, over-sexed and over-violent, all of which is often laughably conveyed). He also does a lot of historical fiction set in the Roman period, though I have not been able to get my hands on any of those.
 
I was also finally able to finish The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (there are beautiful gems in there), King Lear and The Knight’s own book of Chivalry. I am currently reading: David Copperfield by Charles Dickens (well, listening to, since it’s an audiobook, and a large one at that), St. Francis of Assisi by G.K. Chesterton, and Herald of Divine Love by St. Gertrude the Great.
 
I think that’s it for books. In the meantime, I got a DD on the 16th (right before St. Patrick’s Day) on my Sonnet 18! That was a pleasant little surprise.
 
By, the by, if you guys want a good laugh, go to Amazon.com and read the reviews of ‘sugarfree Haribo gummy bears.’ I’m telling you, I’ve rarely laughed so hard in my life. :XD:

Oh! I came across a good meditation yesterday, from the Magnificat Lenten Companion that I want to share with you all:
 
“Once when I was in college, religion came up in a class discussion. One of my classmates said, “To me, Christianity is just more rules.” My classmate was talking about a way of looking at religion that is called moralism. Moralistic religion says that faith is about doing good things and being a good person. Just follow the rules and you’ll get to Heaven. In today’s Gospel [Matthew 23:1-12], Jesus accuses the Pharisees of hypocrisy and pride, but at the heart of both these is moralism. When you put your faith in your good deeds to save you, you tend to become very proud of them and want to show them off to the world. And then when you fail at living up to the moral standards you put so much emphasis on, you want to hide your failings. Christianity is an utterly anti-moralistic religion that tries to squash this pride and hypocrisy. Our faith is primarily a relationship with Jesus Christ, and not, first and foremost, about following the rules. We obey the rules because we love God, and we love God because He loved us first in a free gift that we did nothing to earn. Love is the center of our Faith: the endless love that flows within the Trinity and into which we are drawn through grace.”
 
Heavenly Father, help me to keep your commandments because I love you, and not because I seek my self-worth in my good deeds.
 
Reflection based on Matthew 23:1-12, by Peter Blair

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 San Jose XIV by Meldelen
“Behold the good and faithful servant whom the Lord has placed in charge of His household.” - Entrance

Today’s Liturgy in honor of St. Joseph brings out the chief characteristics of this humble, silent man who occupied a place of first importance in the entrance of the Son of God into human history. A descendant of David—“son of David” as the Gospel says (Matthew 1:20)—he is the link that joins Christ to that line of descent from which Israel awaited the Messiah. Thus the prophecy made to David is verified through the humble carpenter of Nazareth: “Your house and your kingdom shall be made sure for ever before me; your throne shall be established forever” (II Samuel 7:16, First Reading). Joseph is not the natural father of Jesus for he did not give Him life, but he is the virginal father who, by the divine command, fulfills a legal function in His regard: he gives Him a Name, establishes Him in his household, acts as His guardian, provides for His sustenance. This very intimate relationship with Jesus comes to him through his marriage with Mary.
 
Joseph is the “just man” (Matthew 1:19) to whom was entrusted the mission of being the virginal spouse of the most exalted of God’s creatures, and the virginal father of the Son of the Most High. He is “just” in the full sense of the word, which signifies perfect virtue and holiness. He possesses a justice which pervades his whole being, through a total purity of heart and life, a total adherence to God and to His Will. All this takes place in a pattern of life that is as humble and hidden as possible, and yet is resplendent with faith and love. “The just man lives by faith” (Romans 1:171); and Joseph, the pre-eminently “just man” lives this virtue to its maximum.
 
The second reading very fittingly (Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22) speaks of Abraham’s faith, presenting it as a type or symbol of St. Joseph’s. Abraham believed “against hope” (ib. 18) that he would become the father of a great family, and he continued to believe it even when, in obedience to the divine command, he was about to sacrifice his only son. Faced with the confusing mystery of Mary’s motherhood, Joseph believed the angel’s words: “That which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:20), and, cutting short all hesitation, obeyed his command: “Do not fear to take Mary, your wife” (Matthew 1:20). Even more than Abraham, he had to believe what was humanly unthinkable: the motherhood of a virgin, the Incarnation of the Son of God. Because of his faith and obedience, he merited to have these great mysteries accomplished under his roof.
 
The entire life of St. Joseph was one prolonged act of faith and obedience in the most obscure and humanly difficult circumstances. Shortly after the birth of Jesus he heard the words: “Rise, take the Child and His Mother, and flee to Egypt” (Matthew 2:13) and later, the angel of the Lord commanded: “Go into the land of Israel” (Matthew 2:20). Immediately—by night—Joseph obeyed. He did not delay, did not ask for explanations, did not offer objections. He is literally, “the wise and faithful steward, whom his master will set over His household” (Luke 14:42), entirely at God’s service, always ready at His signal, on the alert to serve Him. A dedication such as this reveals a perfect love; Joseph loved God with all his heart, with all his mind, with all his strength.
 
His position as head of the Holy Family, caused him to enter into a special intimacy with God whose place he held; he carried out His orders, and interpreted His Will in regard to Mary whose husband he was and in regard to the Son of God made man, whom he saw grow under his very eyes, whom he sustained by his labor. Ever since the angel had revealed to him the secret of Mary’s motherhood, Joseph lived in an orbit of the mystery of the Incarnation; he was its spectator, its guardian, its adorer and its servant. His existence was to be consumed in these duties, in a climate of communion with Jesus and Mary, and of silent and adoring prayer. He neither had not sought anything for himself; Jesus called him father, but Joseph knew well that He was not his son, and Jesus Himself would confirm this: “Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” (Luke 2:49). Mary was his wife, but Joseph knew that she belonged exclusively to God, and he watched over her for Him, assisting her in her mission as Mother of the Son of God. Then when his work was no longer needed, he disappeared in silence. St. Joseph still occupies a most important place in the Church, continuing, for the entire family of believers, the work of silent and provident guardianship begun for the little family of Nazareth. Thus the Church venerates him, and invokes him as its protector, and thus too the faithful regard him while they study to imitate his virtues. For all of us, in the dark moments of life, St. Joseph’s example is an encouragement to unshakeable faith, to unreserved adherence to the Will of God, to unstinting service.
 
O Joseph, proclaim…the wonders that your eyes have contemplated: you saw the Infant resting in the arms of the Virgin; you adored Him with the Wise Men; you gave glory to God with the shepherds according to the angel’s words: pray to Christ, God, that our souls may be saved…
 
Your soul was ever obedient to the divine command; And filled with a purity without equal, O blessed Joseph, You deserved to receive as a bride her who is pure and immaculate among women; You were the guardian of this Virgin, when she merited to become the Tabernacle of the Creator…
 
You led the pure Virgin from the city of David into Egypt, that holy Virgin who was like a mysterious cloud that keeps the Sun of Justice hidden in its breast…O Joseph, priest of the incomprehensible mystery!
 
With what wisdom, O Joseph, you assisted God who became a Child in the flesh; you served Him like one of his angels; He enlightened you directly; you welcomed within you His spiritual rays. O blessed one! You seemed all resplendent with light in your heat and in your soul. He who with one word has shaped Heaven, earth and sea, was called the workman’s son, your son, O wonderful Joseph! You were constituted father of Him who is without beginning, and who glorified you as the minister of a mystery tat surpasses all understanding.
 
How precious was your death in the eyes of the Lord, O blessed Joseph! Consecrated to the Lord from infancy, you were the holy guardian of the Blessed Virgin, and you sang with her the canticle: “Let every creature bless the Lord, exalt and praise Him for ever and ever. Amen.”
- Hymn of the Greek Church, from Les plus beaux texts sur St. Joseph
 
 O Joseph, man of wisdom, rich in goodness…you were made holy by holding Christ in your arms. Now sanctify those who celebrate your memory, O just one, Joseph most holy, husband of the all-holy Mother of God…O happy one, never cease asking the Word to free from temptation those who venerate you. You watched over the Immaculate One, who was ever a virgin, within whom the Word was made flesh. You watched over her after the mysterious birth. O Joseph, who bore God in your arms, remember us with her.
- Giuseppe l’Innografo, from Les plus beaux texts sur St. Joseph
 
- meditation by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.

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San Jose XI by Meldelen
 
There is a general rule concerning all special graces granted to any human being. Whenever the divine favor chooses someone to receive a special grace, or to accept a lofty vocation, God adorns the person chosen with all the gifts of the Spirit needed to fulfill the task at hand.
 
This general rule is especially verified in the case of Saint Joseph, the foster-father of our Lord and the husband of the Queen of our world, enthroned above the angels. He was chosen by the eternal Father as the trustworthy guardian and protector of his greatest treasures, namely, his divine Son and Mary, Joseph’s wife. He carried out this vocation with complete fidelity until at last God called him, saying: Good and faithful servant enter into the joy of your Lord.
 
What then is Joseph’s position in the whole Church of Christ? Is he not a man chosen and set apart? Through him and, yes, under him, Christ was fittingly and honorably introduced into the world. Holy Church in its entirety is indebted to the Virgin Mother because through her it was judged worthy to receive Christ. But after her we undoubtedly owe special gratitude and reverence to Saint Joseph.
 
In him the Old Testament finds its fitting close. He brought the noble line of patriarchs and prophets to its promised fulfillment. What the divine goodness had offered as a promise to them, he held in his arms.
 
Obviously, Christ does not now deny to Joseph that intimacy, reverence and very high honor which he gave him on earth, as a son to his father. Rather we must say that in heaven Christ completes and perfects all that he gave at Nazareth.
Now we can see how the last summoning words of the Lord appropriately apply to Saint Joseph: Enter into the joy of your Lord. In fact, although the joy of eternal happiness enters into the soul of a man, the Lord preferred to say to Joseph: Enter into joy. His intention was that the words should have a hidden spiritual meaning for us. They convey not only that this holy man possesses an inward joy, but also that it surrounds him and engulfs him like an infinite abyss.
 
Remember us, Saint Joseph, and plead for us to your foster-child. Ask your most holy bride, the Virgin Mary, to look kindly upon us, since she is the mother of him who with the Father and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns eternally. Amen.
- From a sermon by Saint Bernadine of Siena, priest

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


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Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

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Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppes– Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
5. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
6. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
7. The Decameron– Boccaccio
8. Woman - Edith Stein
9. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
10. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
11. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
12. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy

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The Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus

Journal Entry: Fri Jan 3, 2014, 1:34 PM






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Jesus, the very thought of Thee
with sweetness fills my breast!
Yet sweeter far Thy face to see,
and in Thy Presence rest.

No voice can sing, no heart can frame,
nor can the memory find,
a sweeter sound than Jesus' Name,
the Savior of mankind.

O hope of every contrite heart!
O joy of all the meek!
to those who fall, how kind Thou art!
how good to those who seek!

But what to those who find? Ah! this
no tongue nor pen can show;
the love of Jesus, what it is,
none but His loved ones know.

Jesus! our only hope be Thou,
as Thou our prize shalt be;
in Thee be all our glory now,
and through eternity. Amen.


- Jesu Dulcis Memoria by St. Bernard of Clairvaux
</span>www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7fhC7…

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Salvete all!

Happy Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus! And Merry Christmas! Hah, the Christmas season lasts until the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, so liturgically I can still say that. ;-) Happy New Year as well! I'm excited about this 2014. :D Do you guys have any New Year's resolutions? I think I'm still coming up with some. Hah, I probably should have given them more thought before the year ended. ;-) It also happens to be J.R.R. Tolkien's 122nd birthday. So happy birthday Professor Tolkien! :aww:

“O Lord, our God, how majestic is your Name in all the earth!” - Psalm 8:1

“At the end of eight days when He was circumcised, He was called Jesus, the name given by the angel before He was conceived” (Luke 2:21?. This name was not chosen on earth, but in heaven, and was made known, by God’s will, to both Mary and Joseph. To Mary, the angel had said: “You will conceive…and bear a son and you shall call His Name Jesus” (Luke 1:31); and to Joseph: “He will save His people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21). No name so expresses the deep reality of Him who bears it as the name which was given to the Son of the Most High. Jesus, as His Name declares, is by His nature the Lord who saves.

“There is no other Name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12), declares St. Peter after healing, in the name of Jesus, the cripple who sought alms at the gate of the temple. It is “by the Name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth…(that) this man is standing before you well—His Name, by faith in His Name, has made this man strong…” (Acts 4:10; 3:16). Peter, the foundation stone of the Church, is the first to proclaim the saving powers of the Name of Jesus: the Church is built upon Jesus in whose Name we are baptized, redeemed from sin, made children of God and brought to eternal life. “There is salvation in no one else” (Acts 4:12)

Jesus Himself said: “If you ask anything of the Father, He will give it to you in my Name; ask and you will receive” (John 16:23-24). The Father never rejects anyone who prays to Him in the Name of His Son. It is not the name itself that is of special value, but what it stands for; the Name of Jesus is all-powerful because it designates the mystery, the power and the mission of the Son of God who became man precisely in order to be the Savior of the world. To call upon His Holy Name with trust is to appeal to His Incarnation, His Passion, and Death, His Resurrection; such a call is always heard because it rises up to God supported by the infinite merits of Jesus the Savior.

St. Paul indicates that the glory of the Name of Jesus is a reward of His immense abasement: “He emptied Himself, taking the form of a slave…He humbled Himself and became obedient unto death, even death on a cross. Therefore, God has highly exalted Him and bestowed on Him the Name which is above every other Name; that at the Name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth” (Philippians 2:2, 7-10). Here again the Name represents the supreme dignity of Christ, infinitely superior to every created dignity, in whose presence all creatures must pay adoring homage, recognizing that “Jesus Christ is Lord” and God. All in heaven and on earth, angels, men and the entire universe are called to proclaim and adore the divinity of Jesus, and to praise His Holy Name. The whole world seems to keep silence and stop for a moment in its course to hear and glorify that most Holy Name in which is found the greatest glory of God and the greatest good of man: Let “every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father”

“The Lord”—affirms the Council—“is the focal point of the longings of history and of civilization, the center of the human race, the joy of every heart, and the answer to all its yearnings”. Mankind finds in Jesus all that it needs and all that it thirsts for: peace, pardon, love, liberty, joy, eternal salvation.

St. Bernard never tires of singing of the glories of the Name of Jesus: “it is light when it is preached, it is food in meditation, it is balm and healing when it is invoked for aid…Is it not by the light of this Name that God has called us into His marvelous light?...Do you not feel strengthened as often as you recall it to mind?...The name of Jesus is honey in the mouth, music in the ear, gladness in the heart. But it is also a remedy. Are any of you sad? Let Jesus come into the heart. Is anyone falling into sin? Or is he rushing in desperation into the snare of death? If he calls upon this life-giving Name will he not straightaway breathe again the breath of life?” On the Canticle of Canticles 15:5-6).


* * * * * * *


“Looking for the blessed hope and coming of Our Savior Jesus Christ.” Titus 2:13

Time passes and does not return. God has assigned to each of us a definite time in which to fulfill His divine plan for our soul, the time of our life on earth. For each of us this is “the acceptable time…the day of salvation” (2 Corinthians 6:2), in which we must work diligently to cooperate with the grace given us for our sanctification; we have only this time and shall have no more. Time ill-spent is lost forever. Our life is made up of uninterrupted, continual flow of time, which never returns. In eternity, on the contrary, time will be no more; we shall be established forever in the degree of love which we have reached now, in time. If we have attained a high degree of love, we shall be fixed forever in that degree of love and glory; if we possess only a slight degree, that is all we shall have throughout eternity. No further progress will be possible when time has ended. St. Paul urges: “Let us not grow weary in well-doing, for in due season we shall reap if we do not lose heart. So then as we have opportunity, let us do good to all men.” (Galatians 6:9-10) Each passing year is a warning to treasure each present moment and to sanctify it with charity. “We must give each moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it value in love.” (Sister Carmela of the Holy Spirit)

Charity sanctifies every action, even the most trivial and indifferent, and confers upon it a value for eternal life. In fact, “love urges us to live more intensely for Him who died for us and rose again. We strive, therefore, to please the Lord in all things…Thus when we have finished the one and only course of our earthly life, we may merit to enter into the marriage feast with Him and to be numbered among the blessed.” By living in this manner we carry out the divine plan for our soul, and reach that level of love that God expects of us, and with which we shall love and glorify Him for eternity.

We have only the short day of this earthly life to grow in love and if we wish to derive from it the greatest possible benefit we must apply ourselves not only to doing good works, but to doing them with our whole heart, and with all the generosity of which we are capable, overcoming the inertia and pettiness which always make us inclined to the least effort. Then love will grow immeasurably and we shall be able to give the Lord the beautiful witness of St. Therese of the Child Jesus: “Your love…has grown within me and now it is an abyss, the depths of which I cannot fathom” (Autobiography of St. Therese)

But what are these good works we must each accomplish? Those which are pointed out to us through the will of God; only these can sanctify. Jesus used to say: I “must work the works of Him who sent me, while it is day. Night comes when no one can work” (John 9:4). This is why He became man: “I have come to do your will, O God.” (Hebrews 10:7); this is why He lived: “Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house” (Luke 2:49). Life has one single purpose for Jesus, one single obligation: the will of His Father, the interests of His Father, the glory of His Father.

To be one of Jesus’ followers means trying to relive his conduct fully, realizing that only one thing matters: “attending to the Father’s business.” Instead of this, how many times our lives are dispersed in all directions and in so many useless activities, in passing things that disappear with time and only reflect the vanity of the world. Only the time that is dedicated to God and to fulfilling His Will will endure; being fixed in God makes man participate in His immutability. Then the passage of time will not cast a shadow of sadness on our lives, but rather fill our hearts with joy because it brings our eternal meeting with God the closer. May each passing year be a step forward toward our true home, and each day be marked with yearning for the Lord: “Come, Lord Jesus” (Revelations 22:20).

- meditations by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


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Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
4. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
5. King Lear - Shakespeare
6. The Decameron– Boccaccio
7. The Knight’s own book of Chivalry– Geoffrey de Charny
8. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
9. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
10. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
11. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
12. Woman - Edith Stein
13. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
14. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

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My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

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  • Listening to: Jesu Dulcis Memoria
  • Reading: Geoffroi de Charny's "Book of Chivalry"
  • Watching: BBC Anna Karenina
  • Playing: Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance II

Gaudete Sunday 2013

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 8:51 PM
  • Listening to: Introitus: Gaudete in Domino
  • Reading: Geoffroi de Charny's "Book of Chivalry"
  • Watching: BBC Anna Karenina
  • Playing: Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance II
  • Eating: Creme Puffs
  • Drinking: Water
Theotokos by Meldelen


Gaudete, gaudete Christus est natus
Ex Maria virgine gaudete
Gaudete, gaudete Christus est natus
Ex Maria virgine gaudete!

- www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vryl9…

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Rejoice in the Lord always;
again I say, rejoice!
Let your forbearance be known to all,
for the Lord is near at hand;
have no anxiety about anything,
but in all things, by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving,
let your requests be known to God.

- Philippians 4:4-6
www.youtube.com/watch?v=fh-s8G…

Salvete all!

Happy Third Sunday of Advent!  This day is also known as “Gaudete Sunday.” This is the day on which the Church bids us to rejoice, because the Feast of Christ’s birth is near at hand.

“Come, O Lord and save us. - Gaudete Responsory

“By the Third Sunday of Advent the Liturgy is dominated by the thought of the near approach of Christmas, which gives it a festive tone. In fact Christmas, the commemoration of the Incarnation of the Son of God, marks the beginning of salvation: mankind sees the ancient promise fulfilled and has its Savior. Today’s readings are a message of consolation and comfort: “Say to those who are fearful of heart, ‘Be strong, fear not. Behold your God…will come and save you.’ Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf unstopped. Then shall the lame man leap like a stag, and the tongue of the dumb sing for joy” (Isaiah 35:4-5). The words of Isaiah were directed toward comforting the exiled people of Israel, but can equally be applied to all who want to be more deeply converted to God, yet feel incapable of breaking the bonds of sin and mediocrity and worldly vanity; all are encouraged to have confidence in the Savior. He will come to give strength and to sustain the weak, healing the wounds of sin and bringing salvation to all.

With the coming of Jesus, prophecy was literally fulfilled, and He Himself made use of it to prove His Messiahship. The Baptist has been following Jesus’ movements from the prison where Herod imprisoned him; he knows that Jesus is the Messiah, yet his behavior, so different from what had been foretold had perhaps confused him; besides, John’s disciples need enlightenment; so he sends them to ask for the Lord: “Are you He who is to come, or shall we look for another?” (Matthew 11:3). In answer, Jesus points to the miracles He has worked: “Go and tell John what you hear and see: the blindreceieve their sight, and the lame walk, lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, the poor have good news preached to them”. The fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy is evident. But Jesus continues: “Blessed is he who takes no offense at me” (Matthew 11:4-6). Jesus accomplishes His work as Savior without any ostentation, simply and humbly; He does not present Himself as a conqueror, but rather as one who is meek; as a poor man who has come to preach the gospel to the poor, to heal the sick, and to save sinners. His manner might scandalize those who were looking for a powerful and glorious Messiah, but it brought great encouragement to those who felt themselves poor, little and sick, in need of salvation. Hearts swelled with hope before the Savior’s kindness and meekness.

All this is reinforced in the second reading: “Establish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is at hand” (James 5:8). The sentiments of faith with which we prepare for Christmas are identical with those which should dispose us for the glorious return of the Lord when He will come not only as Savior, but also as Judge. While waiting we need to practice His commandment of love which will make us well-disposed and merciful toward all; we should “take the prophets who spoke in the name of the Lord…as an example of suffering and patience” (James 5:10). Just as the prohets kept their eyes continually turned toward the promised Redeemer, so ought we to live with hearts turned toward the coming of Jesus, renewing this disposition every day through grace and the Eucharist, and deepening it into greater intimacy through the devout celebration of Christmas, until it becomes final and beautifying on the last day.

I will extol you, my God and king;
I will bless your name forever and ever.
Every day I will bless you;
I will praise your name forever and ever.

Great is the LORD and worthy of much praise,
whose grandeur is beyond understanding.
One generation praises your deeds to the next
and proclaims your mighty works.

They speak of the splendor of your majestic glory,
tell of your wonderful deeds.
They speak of the power of your awesome acts
and recount your great deeds.

They celebrate your abounding goodness
and joyfully sing of your justice.
The LORD is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger and abounding in mercy.

The LORD is good to all,
compassionate toward all your works.
All your works give you thanks, LORD
and your faithful bless you.

They speak of the glory of your reign
and tell of your mighty works,
Making known to the sons of men your mighty acts,
the majestic glory of your rule.

Your reign is a reign for all ages,
your dominion for all generations.
The LORD is trustworthy in all his words,
and loving in all his works.

The LORD supports all who are falling
and raises up all who are bowed down.
The eyes of all look hopefully to you;
you give them their food in due season.

You open wide your hand
and satisfy the desire of every living thing.
The LORD is just in all his ways,
merciful in all his works.

The LORD is near to all who call upon him,
to all who call upon him in truth.
He fulfills the desire of those who fear him;
he hears their cry and saves them.

The LORD watches over all who love him,
but all the wicked he destroys.
My mouth will speak the praises of the LORD;
all flesh will bless his holy name forever and ever.

~ Psalm 145

- meditations by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.


The bride of Christ by KreksofinArt


"Take time to be aware that in the very midst of our busy preparations for the celebration of Christ's birth in ancient Bethlehem, Christ is reborn in the Bethlehems of our homes and daily lives. Take time, slow down, be still, be awake to the Divine Mystery that looks so common and so ordinary yet is wondrously present.

"An old abbot was fond of saying, 'The devil is always the most active on the highest feast days.'

"The supreme trick of Old Scratch is to have us so busy decorating, preparing food, practicing music and cleaning in preparation for the feast of Christmas that we actually miss the coming of Christ. Hurt feelings, anger, impatience, injured egos—the list of clouds that busyness creates to blind us to the birth can be long, but it is familiar to us all."

- Take Time to be Aware - Edward Hays, A Pilgrim's Almanac, p. 196


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The first purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Hope. :floating:
The second purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Love. :heart:
The third rose candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Joy. :dance:
:holly: :floating: :holly: Advent Wreath :holly: :floating: :holly:
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:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

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New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


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Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

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Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
4. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
5. King Lear - Shakespeare
6. The Decameron– Boccaccio
7. The Knight’s own book of Chivalry– Geoffrey de Charny
8. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
9. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
10. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
11. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
12. Woman - Edith Stein
13. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
14. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

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My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

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Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

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The Second Sunday of Advent 2013

Sun Dec 8, 2013, 4:42 PM
The Immaculata by Theophilia


"You are All-Beautiful, O Mary,
and the stain of sin is not in you.
Your clothing is white as snow,
and your face is like the sun.
You are All-Pure, O Mary,
and the stain of sin is not in you.
You are the glory of Jerusalem,
you are the great joy of Israel,
you are the highest honor of our race.
You are completely beautiful, O Mary."


~ "Tota pulchra es, Maria" (4th century prayer) (www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lf2Mm…)

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Salvete all!

Happy Second Sunday of Advent! Many thanks to TurkeySM for the premium membership (thank you again for that great kindness). So this past week has been pretty busy. I finished up two commissions, and actually managed to finish reading two books: Angels in Iron by Nicholas C. Prata and St. Teresa's Autobiography.

Happy Feast of the Immaculate Conception!

Here are two great readings that I came across this week and I really just wanted to share them with you all. They're both about the Will of God:

“The way which leads to holiness, and therefore to God, cannot be marked out except by God Himself by His Will. Jesus stated emphatically: “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the Kingdom of Heaven, but he who does the will of my Father who is in Heaven.” (Matthew 7:21). And in order to make it clear that those who are most closely united to Him and most favored by Him are precisely those who do God’s will, he added, “Whoever does the will of my Father in Heaven is my brother, and sister, and mother” (Matthew 12:50).

The saints found their inspiration in the school of Jesus. After St. Teresa of Jesus had experienced the most sublime mystical communications she did not hesitate to declare “the highest perfection consists not in interior favors or in great raptures or in visions or in the spirit of prophecy, but in the bringing of our wills so closely into conformity with the will of God that, as soon as we realize He wills anything, we desire it ourselves with all out might, and take the bitter with the sweet.” St. Theresa of the Child Jesus echoes this: “Perfection consists in doing His will, in being what He wills us to be”.

True love of God consists in adhering perfectly to His holy will, not wanting to do or be anything in this life but what the Lord wishes, to the point that we become “a living will of God.” When we view holiness in this light, it is possible for every soul of good will; indeed, it is quite possible that one who leads a humble, hidden life may adhere to the divine will as well as, or perhaps even better than, a great saint to whom God has entrusted an important mission, and who has been enriched with special mystical graces. The more a soul does, and enjoys doing, the will of God, the more perfect and holy it is.

“Everyone who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house upon the rock; and the rain fell and the floods came, and the wind blew and beat upon that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock” (Matthew 7:24-25). The will of God which is revealed in Sacred Scripture, especially in His commandments, is manifested in the concrete acts of Providence which supports and guides the entire life of man; it is the solid and secure rock upon which the edifice of Christian holiness must be built. Only upon such a foundation can it be built high without danger of falling under the fury of storms.

Whoever aspires to sanctity must always be on guard against the temptation of wanting to be a saint after his own fashion, according to his own views and plans and choices. That would be a contradiction, for only God, the one holy One, can make us holy, only He knows what is really profitable for our sanctification. The only path that infallibly leads to holiness is the one God has marked out. Therefore the first and indispensable condition for not working in vain is for the soul to abandon itself completely to the will of God, letting itself be led by Him with entire with docility.

St. John of the Cross teaches that in perfect union with God, and hence in the state of sanctity, “a man’s will is so completely transformed into God’s will that it excludes anything contrary to God’s will, and in all and through all is motivated by the will of God.” There is question here of a transformation through love through which a man does not want, seek, desire or do anything but the will of God, who is loved above all things, including self. Love in fact, leads to willing and not willing the same things, to an identity of affections, desires, ideals and actions.

And while the soul, with the help of grace, is endeavoring to adhere to the will of God in all things, this same will is sanctifying it and making it capable of an ever fuller adherence which will develop progressibvely into total conformity to the divine will. These are the souls who are pleasing to God, the just ones whom Isaiah prophesied would be the only ones worthy to enter the new Jerusalem: “Let the righteous nations which keeps faith enter in” (Isaiah 26:2)

“O my God, teach me not only what you want, but also what you are, because the more I know you the more I will love you, and loving you is my first duty, the thing you want most from me; it is also my greatest need…And together with your light give me the strength to follow it, my God; it is not enough to love you and to know your will, one must have the courage to serve you and to do what you want…

Cure me, Lord, I am blind and do not perceive your will; there are a thousand ways in which I do not know what you want from me; I do not see your beauty, and by not seeing you I do not love you enough…Enlighten my eyes, O God, cure my blindness, let me see your will and see your beauty…I am crippled too, O God; cure my weak feet! I have not the strength to come to you when you call me or to walk in your ways, no strength to put into practice what you show me: I drag my legs and hobble miserably when it comes to following you. O my God, cure me of this limp, make me run after you, following the scent of your perfume, instead of limping and dragging myself along in your footsteps…

Make me whole, give me the strength to carry my cross and follow you; the strength to do all you expect of me…O my God! And then, make me adore you with all the strength of my soul, and praise you from the bottom of my heart…Grant that I may be consumed and engulfed and lost in adoring you, my beloved Jesus! The light to see your will, the strength to carry it out, the love to lose myself in adoring you—these are the graces for you to pour out upon me…O my God, let me share abundantly in all three; you know how great is the need of this poor one who lies at your feet, so blind, so crippled, so cold.”

- C. de Foucard, “Sulle feste dell’anno”

“Lead me in your truth, and teach me; for you are the God of my salvation.” (Psalm 25:5)

“In that day the deaf shall hear…the eyes of the blind shall see” (Isaiah 29:18). The prophecy of Isaiah was fully verified in the coming of Jesus, not only in the material sense, but in spiritual ways also: He prepared men’s hearts to listen to the word of God and opened their eyes to recognize His ways and His will. The world always has need of this illumination. The sorrowful, trusting appeal of the two blind men of Jericho: “Have mercy on is, O Son of David” (Matthew 9:27, is always timely, especially during Advent, which is a time of a renewed desire for salvation and sanctity. Besides it is always necessary for Jesus to free men from the “darkness and the shadow” that impede the recognition and full execution of the divine will.

The will of God is not manifested only through exact precepts: it is also written in the various circumstances of life which create for every man duties that he cannot escape. In the first plave there are the duties of one’s own state of life; they determine for each of us the manner of our daily conformity to the will of God. For the religious these are the duties prescribed by the Rule he has embraced and by the living voice of his superiors; for the priest, those which derive from his ministry in full union of mind and action with his bishop; for the laity, the obligations inherent in the family, in their various professions, and in the society in which they live. In addition there are duties connected with other situations which are ordered, or at least permitted, by God: health or sickness, wealth or poverty, aridity or spiritual comfort, failure or success, misfortunes or consolations. All is portioned out by the paternal hand of God who makes all things “word for good with those who love him” (Romans 8:28). It is according to all these circumstances that God presents to each of us our own particular duties of submission, patience, charity, and labor, and perhaps those of separation, sacrifice or generosity. If we follow the path of duty, we can be sure we are traveling in the way of God’s will and are growing in his love.

“If love, as good seed, is to grow and bring forth fruit in the soul, each one of the faithful must willingly hear the word of God [even the silent word which is to be found in the circumstances of life], and with the help of His grace act to fulfill His will”

Holiness properly consists only in conformity to the divine will it is expressed in continual and exact fulfillment of the duties of one’s own state. Yet holiness does not consist just in extraordinary undertakings; essentially it is to be found in the line of duty, and is therefore within the reach of every soul of good will. However it does require a generous and constant fulfillment of one’s duty. Generous: that is, without negligence, anxious to please God in every act, ready to embrace with love each expression of His will. Constant: in all circumstances and situations, even in those that are less happy and pleasing, as also in dark moments of sadness, weariness and aridity, and all this, day and day. “What uncommon virtue is needed to accomplish…with attention, piety and interior fervor of spirit, the whole combination of common things which fill up our daily life.” (Pius XI)

This exercise will be easier the more we learn to look at all the details of our life in the light of faith, getting used to recognizing in them the signs of the will of God. As soon as one who really loves Our Lord, notices that there is something God wants, he does it without hesitation, even if it costs him dearly. Certain delays and resistances stem not so much from unwillingness as from not understanding and recognizing the will of God. It is the spirit of faith that must illuminate us on this very important point.

“All of Christ’s faithful, whatever be the conditions, duties and circumstances of their lives, will grow in holiness day by day through these very situations if they accept all of them with faith from the hand of their heavenly Father”. Faith makes us go beyond the opaqueness of worldly affairs and see the hand of God who orders and guides everything for the sanctification of His elect. One never says no to God.

“Now I freely give my will to you, O Lord, even though I do so at a time in which I am not free of self-interest. For I have felt and have had great experience of the gain that comes from freely abandoning my will to yours…Your will, Lord, be done in me in every way and manner that you want. If you want it to be done with trials, strengthen me and let them come; if with persecutions, illnesses, dishonors, and a lack of life’s necessities, here I am, my Father…

Oh what strength lies in this gift! It does nothing less, when accompanied by the necessary determination, than draw the Almighty so that He becomes one with our lowliness, transforms us into Himself, and effects a union of the Creator with the creature…

And the more our deeds show that these are not merely polite words, all the more do you bring us to yourself and raise the soul from itself and all earthly things so as to make it capable of receiving great favors, for you never finish repaying this service in the present life. You esteem it so highly that we do not ourselves know how to ask for ourselves, and you never tire of giving. Not content with having made this soul one with yourself, you begin to find your delight in it, reveal your secrets, and rejoice that it knows what it has gained and something of what you will give it.”

- St. Teresa of Jesus

- meditations by Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.



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The first purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Hope. :floating:
The second purple candle in the Advent Wreath symbolizes Love. :heart:

:holly: :floating: :holly: Advent Wreath :holly: :floating: :holly:
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Our Lady of the Gate of Dawn by Theophilia

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *


New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
4. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
5. King Lear - Shakespeare
6. The Decameron– Boccaccio
7. The Knight’s own book of Chivalry– Geoffrey de Charny
8. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
9. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
10. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
11. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
12. Woman - Edith Stein
13. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
14. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:iconusa-plz1::iconusa-plz2:

My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

:iconaodhagain: :iconthatoneguy92: :iconbohemianbeachcomber: :iconblackcat101: :iconsaxonwithaxe: :iconaranov: :icongingeropal: :iconelavoria: :iconharumeau: :iconfirefiriel: :iconachen089: :icondashinvaine: :iconithelda: :iconvenicegirl: :iconmiscellani: :iconseekhim: :icondrocan: :iconalquanen-finfalas: :iconnot-a-great-artist: :iconmariapaulina: :iconanelphia: :iconeinaari: :iconfaetian: :iconalqualaure: :iconjuniperfern: :iconfliegenlicht: :iconmahira-chan: :iconlupusacerbus: :iconnadyia-drymer: :icongryffgirl:

Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


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  • Listening to: Creator of the Stars of Night
  • Playing: Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance II
  • Listening to: Of the Fathers Love Begotten
  • Reading: St. Teresa of Avilas Autobiography
  • Watching: BBC Anna Karenina
  • Playing: Baldurs Gate: Dark Alliance II
  • Eating: Vanilla Wafers
  • Drinking: Water
advent I by LunaLovegood36

“Come, let us walk in the light of the Lord” (Isaiah 2:5)

“We beg you, All-powerful God, to increase our strength of will for doing good that Christ may find us waiting for His coming and may call us to His side in the Kingdom of Heaven.” - Collect from the First Sunday of Advent

“Brothers and sisters: You know the time; it is the hour now for you to awake from sleep. For our salvation is nearer now than when we first believed; the night is advanced, the day is at hand. Let us then throw off the works of darkness and put on the armor of light; let us conduct ourselves properly as in the day, not in orgies and drunkenness, not in promiscuity and lust, not in rivalry and jealousy. But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the desires of the flesh.” – Romans 13:11-14

:snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake:

Advent wreath by bornthisway7

Salvete all!

Happy First Sunday of Advent! It’s been a good long while, hasn’t it? My last journal entry was back in, what, June? Eeeek. Well, that gives you an idea of how often I’ve been updating stuff. *is ashamed of self* I’ve just been really, really bad at stuff this whole semester. Getting back to people, writing letters, finishing art projects, reading books, writing e-mails, figuring out my life…well, at least I’ve been uploading art, right? Heh. There’s been no shortage of projects, that’s for sure. I can’t say I’ve been swamped exactly, but it certainly seems like it sometimes, since I feel like I always have some project that I have to get done first before I do anything nice and fuzzy and fun (CotW comics, for example). So I have been busy, but I feel like I could also be working a lot harder and be much, much more disciplined about it. :hmm:

So, what have I been up to? Well, I have read a few books (though not nearly as many as I could have) and I managed at one point to memorize Chesterton’s Lepanto. I don’t know how much of it I can recite now though. :XD:  I’ve also almost finished St. Teresa of Avila’s Autobiography (also some very excellent stuff, clearly). I haven’t read much fiction, which is a pity. My book shelf is filled with books I keep buying from Amazon.com that I still haven’t read yet. :XD: However, I didfinish the amazing HOLY-COW-YOU-FREAKING-HAVE-TO-READ-THIS-BOOK amazing Introduction to the Devout Life by St. Francis de Sales. That man. THAT MAN. Let me tell you about this man. He is freaking amazing. Did I say that already? Well let me say it again. Seriously. He is the patron saint of writers. You know what it means to be the patron saint of writers of a Church that has two-thousand years of other eloquent, insightful, beautiful, highly polished, profound and AMAZING writers…and you are the patron saint of them all? That’s how amazing this man is. His style is simple, elegant, refined, filled to the brim with helpful examples, and is deeply, deeply profound. He was a bishop and a spiritual director during his lifetime, and that really comes out in his writings, because he gets right to the heart of the matter he’s discussing without any wishy-washy delicatel stepping around the issue. St. Francis de Sales knows what’s up. This is hands-down the best Everything-You-Need-to-Know practical guide to the spiritual life. EVER. It is amazing. I had always wished that someone would just write a really good general (but in-depth) book about everything you pretty much need to know about the spiritual life and just put it all in one place. THIS IS THAT BOOK. I highly, highly, HIGHLY recommend reading it. In fact, I cannot recommend reading it highly enough. I think I underlined and ear-marked literally just about every sentence (which ends up not necessarily being very helpful, because I might as well have just underlined the entire book, hah), but that gives you an idea about how much I liked it. In case you hadn’t gotten that impression before. ;-)

I’ll try and keep this life update brief though (raving about St. Francis de Sales notwithstanding). You guys have seen the art, so I won’t get into that too much. I’m currently doing a number of commissions right now (and feverishly working to try and get them done before Christmas) and other projects for Christmas presents, so I’ll upload those as I finish them. As for life for me…I took this past semester off since I got my Associate’s Degree last spring, and I wanted to take some time to figure out what I was doing (before I spent thousands of dollars that I don’t have, for an education that won’t educate me, on a degree that won’t get me a job, to pay off a debt I didn’t need to get into in the first place). I was transferring to a different university during the summer, but that got…eh, long story short the process proved to be overly stress-inducing and complicated when it really ought not to have been…so I just decided to take the semester off. I’ve been at home working and that’s been fine with me.

This past autumn has seen a number of events. Firstly, my second niece, Naomi Grace, was born on October 28th, 2013. SHE IS JUST SO CUTE. Babies are the best. :aww: My little niece Gianna (Naomi’s older sister) turned two on the 8th, and that little kid cracks me up. :XD: She’s so tiny but she is so smart and sassy. Heheh. A few weeks ago I also went on a weekend retreat with some cloistered Dominican nuns who are about an hour away, and that was a really spiritual fruitful time. I’m still definitely discerning religious life, and now I’m looking more and more at the Dominicans. :nod: Another piece of (very sad) news is that my cousin Maria passed away at the age of 38 from pancreatic cancer. She died on Friday, November 8th. We didn’t see her very often (since she lived so far away) but I really miss her.

But that’s enough of a life update. I’m sorry for that, I probably bore you all with my uneventful life. But let’s go back to the beginning of this Advent season. In the Church year, November is the last month of the liturgical year, and it’s particularly focused on the Last things (death, judgment, hell, and heaven) as well as on praying for our departed loved ones and also for other souls of those who have died before us. It also brings our attention to the Last Coming of Jesus Christ in Glory, and this blends very smoothly in with the focus of the season of Advent. Advent is about the anticipation of the two comings of Christ: His First Coming in His Incarnation and in His Second Coming at the end of time.

“The central theme of Advent is the coming of the Lord, considered under various aspects. First of all we see the expectation of the Old Testament, which is constantly directed toward the coming of the Messiah. The prophecies that the Liturgy presents to us during this season, all speak to us of His coming in such a way as to awaken in our hearts that deep desire and need of God which is so alive in the prophetic writings. At the same time they invite us to thank God for the great gift of salvation, which no longer appears on the horizon as a future event that is only promised and hoped for, but as one which has been a consoling reality ever since the Incarnation of the Son of God and His birth in time. The Redeemer has come; in Him the hopes of the Old Testament have been fulfilled and those of the New opened up. This then is the new expectation: the coming of the Savior must be actualized in the heart of each of us, for now all human history points toward the parousia, that is, the return of Christ in glory at the end of time. It is in this context that we must listen to and meditate upon the readings of Advent.

Isaiah stresses the messianic era in which all peoples will converge on Jerusalem to adore the one God: “All nations shall stream toward it and say, ‘Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob that He may teach us His ways.’” (Isaiah 2:3). Reunited in the one true faith, all men will become brothers and shall not “learn war anymore”. Jerusalem is the figure of the Church, constituted by God the “universal sacrament of salvation” (Dogmatic Constitution of the Church); she opens wide her arms to all men to lead them to Christ, so that by following His teachings they may live as brothers in harmony and peace. But how long a road still lies ahead of us before this can be fully realized! Every Christian should be a voice calling men with the ardor of Isaiah to the one faith and to brotherly love. The prophet concludes with forceful invitation, “Come, let us walk in the light of the Lord” (Isaiah 2:5).

In the second reading, St. Paul tells us exactly what we must do to walk in that light: “Cast off the works of darkness” (Romans 13:2), that is, sin in all of its forms, and “put on the armor of light” which means, clothe ourselves with virtue, especially with faith and love. This is all the more urgent “for salvation is nearer to us now”; in fact history is heading towards its last phase: the final coming of the Lord. The time that remains for reaching that goal must be expeditiously spent; the Lord who has already come in His earthly birth at Bethlehem, who is continuously present in the life of each and every man, and who is to come at the end of time, must be welcomed and followed and awaited in faith and hope, and in living and active charity. Jesus Himself spoke of the attitude of vigilant expectancy which should characterize the entire life of the Christian: “Watch, you, therefore; for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming” (Matthew 24:42). This indicates not only the parousia, but also that coming of the Lord which will take place for each of us at the end of our life, when we shall meet our Savior face to face, and which should be the most beautiful of days, the beginning of eternal life. “Therefore, you must be ready; for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect”.

- First Sunday of Advent meditation by
Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.


The first purple candle in the advent wreath symbolizes Hope.

:holly: :floating: :holly: Advent Wreath :holly: :floating: :holly:
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:snowflake: :flame:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:snowflake: :bulletpurple: :bulletpurple: :bulletpink: :bulletpurple: :snowflake:
:holly: :holly: :holly: :holly: :holly: :holly:

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:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you’d like to request a commission or if you’d like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you’d like “Our Lady of Guadalupe” when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you’d probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you’re super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,
* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

Reading List

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
4. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
5. King Lear - Shakespeare
6. The Decameron– Boccaccio
7. The Knight’s own book of Chivalry– Geoffrey de Charny
8. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
9. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
10. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
11. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
12. Woman - Edith Stein
13. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
14. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:iconusa-plz1::iconusa-plz2:

My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

:iconaodhagain: :iconthatoneguy92: :iconbohemianbeachcomber: :iconblackcat101: :iconsaxonwithaxe: :iconaranov: :icongingeropal: :iconelavoria: :iconharumeau: :iconfirefiriel: :iconachen089: :icondashinvaine: :iconithelda: :iconvenicegirl: :iconmiscellani: :iconseekhim: :icondrocan: :iconalquanen-finfalas: :iconnot-a-great-artist: :iconmariapaulina: :iconanelphia: :iconeinaari: :iconfaetian: :iconalqualaure: :iconjuniperfern: :iconfliegenlicht: :iconmahira-chan: :iconlupusacerbus: :iconnadyia-drymer: :icongryffgirl:

Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


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Summer Updates and the Space Trilogy

Sun Jun 16, 2013, 5:25 PM
  • Listening to: Arvo Pärt
  • Reading: &quot;The Histories&quot; – Herodotus
  • Watching: BBC Anna Karenina
  • Playing: Age of Empires II
  • Eating: Pizza
  • Drinking: Vernors

:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

 

 

"She wears sunlight in her hair
And violets in her eyes
And her cheeks are the petals of a rose.
She bears Love on her arm
And lilies are her feet,
And they carry Life wherever she goes.

There are graces on her lips
And rainbows on her robes
And her wreath is the coronet of May.
She is Fairy Queen of earth-
The wand at her heart
Is a Bud from the Triune Bouquet.

She is Mother, Queen, and Maid,
And God is her Child,
And her Courts are the meadows where They play
And her Courts
Forever and for aye.
She is Mary full of grace.
She is Queen of Eternal May."</i>The May Queen ~ Marie Fischer
campus.udayton.edu/mary/resour…

 

 

:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

 

Salvete all!

 

Hey everyone! I hope you all are having a lovely summer so far! I haven't updated in a while so I thought it might be a good idea if I did. I've been meaning to do a journal entry for quite some time actually (still needed to do that Space Trilogy one, right?) and I just never was able to get around to. This Sunday suddenly became unusually clear of things to do, so I decided to take the time and write it before my premium membership runs out. :XD:

 

So, first things first. Some of you may have noticed that I changed my name to "Theophilia" (which was actually the reason I got the premium membership in the first place). I had been thinking for a long time that it was time to change it because, as fun as "LordShadowblade" is, it's not particularly reflective of me or my art. The name Theophilia means "She who loves God" or "[Feminine] Friend of God." It's the feminine form of "Theophilus" which is the name of the person (whether as a specific person or as a literary device) to whom the Gospel of Luke is dedicated to. And since St. Luke is the patron saint of artists ( and especially of sacred art), and since Luke's Gospel is my favorite and I like the name Theophilia, I think it all works out. ;-)

 

Now, to life! I got out of school the second week of May, and I'll be transferring to another university in the Fall (Ugh. Speaking of which, I still need to get back to working on filling out all of the papers and forms and signing up for various things and paying ridiculously exorbitant fees and all of the rest…blegh). I finally just decided that I'd major in Art and minor in history. No, I don't expect to get a job out of it, because I probably won't. But I am of the opinion that school and education should actually be for that: education, a.k.a. learning to better oneself because it's an objectively good thing, as opposed to just being able to get a piece of paper that says you're qualified to do something, whether you actually are or not. So that's my spiel. I'm going into art to improve my quality of art, and I'm doing history, because dang it, I like it. ;-)

 

Speaking of art, I also finished my first painting class ever this past semester. I'm not particularly proud of my portfolio, mostly because the subjects are as boring as sin (i.e. still lifes of junk, such as paper bags, old bottles, plant potters and other trash). But it was good as a discipline for me to have to churn out a bunch of paintings simply because I had to churn out a bunch of paintings. I had hoped it would inspire me to get over my reluctance to pick up a paintbrush and to start a piece I would actually care about. However, I haven't had the time to do much of anything (let alone sit down and paint!) so far this summer. But if anyone is curious or interested, here's my Winter Portfolio for 2013: www.facebook.com/LordShadowbla… I'm not going to put it up on dA, simply because I think it would just clutter up my gallery AND I quite simply just don't like them.

 

As for other art projects, I have a whole lot that just aren't getting done (once again, lack of time to really sit down and work for hours at a time). And seriously, I want to work on my CotW comic so much that it hurts. (UGH. I WANT TO DRAW TEMPLARS. Has it seriously been eight months since I last did a comic? GAH) But I have other more pressing projects with due dates to work on first. :( I have at least three commissions (maybe more) in the works right now, and two others that need to get done soon, and some others that have even sooner due dates. *sigh*

 

So, why is it that I have been so busy of late? Well, other than the typical busyness of the summer months, I have been mostly preoccupied with working. My hours have been a bit scattered here and there, but probably this week or the nest I'll be working full-time, which means that all my precious hours of leisure in which to draw will pretty much be gone. In lieu of being able to draw a lot this summer, I've made a goal for myself to instead draw a sketch a day. Let me just say, I've barely been able to do that. But it's a good discipline, and I need to stop being lazy. I figure that working more will hopefully inspire me to use the hours I do have for drawing much more wisely. But the hours do seem to slip through one's fingers quickly, don't they? And besides that, there's always the formidable obstacle of, well myself. 

"For what I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate…for the good that I want, I do not do, but I practice the very evil that I do not want…I find then the principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good. For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death?" Story. Of. My. Life. So yeah, then there's that. I'll try and work hard to crank out some stuff guys. I'm really sorry. I've really fallen off the saddle in terms of a whole lot of things, and I'm only just starting to get back on. *sigh* I gotta keep that motivation coming. ;-)

 

Oh hey, before I forget! I have 100,000 pageviews coming up fairly soon (I think I'm about 5,000 pageviews away), I'll do a 100,000 kiriban. So anyone who gets the 100,000th pageview can send me a screenshot and I'll make them a picture of their choice (or, heck, I can make them a print for free of any of my existing pictures if they'd like that instead).

 

By the by, GOOGLE EARTH IS SUPER COOOOOOL. I was looking at a bunch of Crusader castles on Cyprus with it the other day. It's a soothing balm upon the heart of this American who pines to see with her own eyes the medieval monuments of elder days. *pines*

 

And now for the long-promised review of C.S. Lewis' Space Trilogy that I read way back in…January…(I'm pathetic, I know). *facepalm*

 

 

:+: THEOPHILIA DISCUSSES: The Space Trilogy:+:

 

:+: REVIEW AT A GLANCE: :+:

 

TITLE: The Space Trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet; Perelandra; That Hideous Strength (A.D. 1938; 1943; 1945)

AUTHOR: C.S. Lewis(November 29th 1898 —November 22nd 1963)

GENRE: Science fiction

LENGTH: 160; 192; 384

DENSITY RATING: :star::star::star::star::star::star-half::star-empty::star-empty::star-empty::star-empty:

OVERALL RATING: :star::star::star::star::star-empty:

 

BACKGROUND

 

I had been told by many different people at various times to read C.S. Lewis' Space Trilogy, so after a lot of urging (and some good swift kicks to the lazy), I got it from the library during Christmas break along with his Till We Have Faces (another good one). I read it all through the last week of December and into early January. The first two are pretty quick, the third and last one is a bit longer, and took more to get through. If you like the Narnia series, I think this might be a good series to read as sort of a companion to it. I read the Chronicles of Narnia after I read the Space Trilogy, and Narnia made a lot more sense to me for having done that. I suppose I had always initially thought of Narnia as an entertaining but fairly shallow Christian allegory aimed at children. Now, after having read the Space Trilogy, I'd argue that Narnia isn't an allegory at all. C.S. Lewis himself said: "You are mistaken when you think that everything in the books "represents" something in this world. Things do that in The Pilgrim's Progress, but I'm not writing in that way. I did not say to myself "Let us represent Jesus as He really is in our world by a Lion in Narnia": I said "Let us suppose that there were a land like Narnia . . ." I wonder why I didn't take him at his word. Essentially, Narnia is more like this, in the Christian perspective God is the ruler of all the worlds. So if there was a world like Narnia inhabited by sentient, talking animals, then it would make sense that if God became incarnate there, he would become talking Beast just like them. I think there's a quote from The Horse and his Boy about just that, but I can't find it. In any case, it's not so much that Narnia is a symbol for our world, so much as that if there were other worlds with the same Creator they'd behave in a similar manner. I hope that makes sense. In essence, that's what the Space Trilogy is more or less about, except it has a lot to do with our world.</span>

 

PLOT SPOILERS

 

:+: SUMMARY :+:

 

Out of the Silent Planet

''red planet'' by beyzayildirim77

 

Dr. Elwin Ransom (a character based somewhat off of J.R.R. Tolkien), a Cambridge professor of philology enjoying his summer taking a walking tour through the English midlands, comes upon a house where an older woman begs him to find her son, who has gone missing. He grudgingly agrees, sets off to find the boy, and discovers him after hearing a loud racket go up from a large country house. He soon discovers that two men (Professor Weston, a physicist, and a Mr. Dick Devine, a former school mate of Ransom's) are trying to force the young man into a building against his will. The two men decide that Ransom would make a better "subject" and so release the boy, who flees home. They welcome Ransom into the house under the pretext of giving the weary man a good night's lodging and drug him. Ransom later awakes to find himself on a space craft headed for a planet called Malacandra (Mars). While regaining consciousness, he hears the two men discussing plans to sacrifice him to the native creatures there, called the sorns. Ransom wakes up and is assigned duties as a cook. It takes them about 90 days to get to Mars, and once they get there Ransom takes his chance and escapes with a knife he had taken from the kitchen.

 

Meanwhile, while badly frightened and wandering about on Malacandra, he discovers many differences between the planets. He soon meets a sentient creature named Hyoi (who is a hross, and is invited to live in their hross village. As a linguist, he is genuinely intrigued by their language and soon comes to understand some bits of it as well as their culture. Eventually, he finds out that there is a lot of gold to be found on Malacandra (called "sun's blood") and he figures that this was Devine's motive for coming.

 

The Hrossa invite Ransom to go on a hunt with them, and while they are out on the river, a spiritual being called an eldil (they're a lot like angels) tells Ransom that should have made a journey to go meet Oyarsa, the eldil ruler of Malacandra, but that since he had not set out before, he now must do so. Ransom hesitates, the hnakrya they're hunting attacks, but Ransom and Hyoi manage to kill it. However, Devine and Weston suddenly stumble upon them (they're still looking for Ransom to deliver him to the sorns) and shoot Hyoi, but flee soon afterwards. Whin, a friend of Hyoi's says the latter died because Ransom disobeyed, and that now Ransom had to make the journey to Oyarsa.

 

Ransom begins the journey, and finally runs into the sorn. It turns out that the sorns are actually peaceful, and that the only reason that the sorns asked for Devine and Weston to return with another person was because Oyarsa wanted to speak with one of the Thulcandrians about the Earth, and the two were too afraid and unwilling to do that. The sorn Augray carries Ransom to Oyarsa the next day. Ransom then meets the pfifltrigg (the third and last sentient species on Malacandra) at Meldilorn, the home of Oyarsa. Eventually it's explained to him that there is an Oyarsa for each planet in the solar system, and they are each responsible for the creatures on their planet, and that they all communicate together. He also learns that the Oyarsa of Thulcandra (Earth) became evil (or "bent") and so the Earth is "Silent" and no news comes to the other Oyarsa from that planet. Hence, why Earth is called "the Silent Planet." Oyarsa asks news of Thulcandra and how the "great war" being waged there by the servants of Maledil (God) goes. Meanwhile, Weston and Devine are brought before the Oyarsa of Malacandra because they have killed several other Hrossa.

 

Weston then goes on to defend himself by expounding his views on the rights of human evolutionary "progress." Ransom tries to translate to the Malacandrians what he's saying, and Oyarsa, while he admits that Weston's motives aren't based on greed but on a sense of duty to the human species, still passes judgment on the two Thulcandrians by forbidding them from returning to Malacandria, and indeed, makes it impossible for them to do so. They are given 90 days to depart and get to Earth before their space-ship will disintegrate, and Oyarsa gives them air and food for the 90 days. Ransom, meanwhile, is invited to stay on Malacandra is he so wishes. Ransom decides to go back to Earth with the other two, and Oyarsa sends an escort of eldil from Deep Heaven (Space) to guard him against the other two who might murder him for the extra rations of air and food.

 

After a difficult journey, they make it back to Earth, and the spaceship is destroyed by Oyarsa. Ransom, realizing how outlandish his story is, keeps it to himself, until the author (Lewis) asks Ransom a linguistic question about a medieval word called "Oyarses" and wonders what it means. Ransom then tells Lewis the whole story, and they decide to publish the account of Ransom's travels as a work of fiction, so that the story would have a chance to get out in the world, even if people didn't realize it really happened.

 

Perelandra

Aphrodite by goodforn0thing

 

Several years after his return from Malacandra, Dr. Elwin Ransom is contacted by the Oyarsa of Mars and is told that he must travel to Venus (Perelandra) to prevent an assault on it by the evil Oyarsa of Thulcandra (Earth). Ransom tells Lewis the news, and departs in a small, one-man vessel. He returns a year later, and tells the whole story of what happened there, which is the rest of the book.

 

Ransom arrives in Perelandra, a fresh-water ocean world with an opaque, golden sky. The only "land" in sight are some sort of floating rafts of vegetation that move with the waves, so it takes Ransom some getting used to to do even simple things like walk or stand up. The rafts are constantly moving, but there are trees and creatures living on the rafts, and sometimes they join and other times the rafts break apart to form small islands. There is one mountain on the planet called "the Fixed Land." Ransom meets Tinidril, the beautiful human-like (though green-skinned) Queen of the Planet, who is merry and gentle. She is the Eve of Venus, while the King (who appears later in the story) is the Adam of Perelandra. They have both been forbidden to sleep on the Fixed Land.

 

All goes well for a while, until Weston arrives on the planet in another spaceship. He meets Ransom near the Fixed Land, where he professes to now no longer profess strict materialism. He now believes in supernatural beings, and indeed seems to believe that anything spiritual is necessarily the highest good. It turns out that Weston may perhaps be demonically possessed, or that indeed the demon might have so completely taken over his body and mind that Weston is dead and gone, and only his body is being kept unnaturally alive. Ransom discovers that the "Unman" Weston is trying to find the Queen and tempt her into disobeying Maledil by sleeping on the Fixed Land. Ransom figures out that his mission is to counter persuade her not to, so that her race will not experience a Fall like that on Earth.

 

The two find the Queen, and the Unman tries to tempt her, while Ransom tries to protect her. This continues for many days and nights when Ransom, now having gone for many days without sleep and being worn down, and seeing that the Queen herself is eventually being worn down by his arguments, starts to become desperate. Ransom finally realizes that a Divine voice is telling him to physically attack and kill the Unman. Ransom debates with himself for a night to see whether this is actually God speaking to him, and finally realizes that it is, and that this is the only way to defeat the Unman.

 

The next morning Ransom attacks the Unman, and after a fierce fight, the Unman flees. Ransom chases him over the ocean and across the floating islands, until at one point 'Weston' seems to snap out and became normal again, which makes Ransom stop attacking. But then the Unman uses this to his advantage and attacks Ransom, dragging him down to the bottom of the ocean to drown him. Realizing he has been tricked, Ransom fights back, and the chase goes through the subterranean caverns and supposedly kills the Unman. Now stuck in a cave, Ransom looks for a way out to the surface. Meanwhile, the Unman is slowly following him from behind. The Unman attacks again near a volcanic gorge and Ransom manages to kill the Unman with a rock, and throws his body into the lava.

Ransom eventually finds his way to the surface, his wounds are all healed (except for a pussy, bleeding wound on his heel). Ransom carves a memorial inscription for Weston at the surface, and finally manages to travel to a large grassy plain. He meets the King and Queen of Perelandra as well as the Oyarsa of Malacandra and Perelandra. The Oyarsa of Perelandra gives over her authority of the Planet to the King and Queen. Ransom's mission now complete, he is sent home to Earth where he is told to prepare to war against the evil forces on Earth.

That Hideous Strength

Planet Earth (this isn't stock !) by sanmonku

 

A young sociologist named Mark Studdock is offered a job at N.I.C.E. (National Institute for Coordinated Experiments) by Lord Feverstone (Dick Devine), which is a company that has been buying up a bunch of land near the University of Edgestow. Mark's wife Jane has been having bizarre nightmares, including one about a severed head. Mrs. Dimble, an old acquaintance, has been evicted from her home and comes to visit Jane. Jane tells her about the dream, and Mrs. Dimble suggests speaking to Miss Ironwood at the town of St. Anne's. Mark tries to get "in" with the N.I.C.E. people, but he can't figure out what his job is exactly, and everything seems rather strange and arbitrary. A man named Bill Hingest (who has just resigned) tells Mark to get out as soon as possible. Hingest is later murdered under mysterious circumstances.

Jane goes to visit Miss Ironwood, and she is told that her dreams are actually visions of actual events. Jane is then introduced to Dr. Elwin Ransom, who is the Director of the group living at a manor in St. Anne's. They try and convince Jane to join them so they can protect her from N.I.C.E. because the latter want to get a hold of her. Meanwhile, Mark is writing propagandist articles for the N.I.C.E. newspapers to start a riot in Edgestow, the riot is started, and, as planned, the N.I.C.E. police take over the town. Jane is arrested for her visions (which Mark does not know about), and the leader of the N.I.C.E. police, a woman named Miss Hardcastle, tortures Jane for information, but is forced to retire because of the violence of the riot. Mark is later introduced to the "Head" of N.I.C.E. which is the severed head of a scientist who had been executed for murder, but has been restored to life through artificial means.

Ransom's people are able to rescue Jane and bring her back to the manor. Jane dreams that a grave is being dug up, and Ransom realizes that N.I.C.E. is looking for the body of Merlin. Jane agrees to guide them to the place in her dream so they can get to Merlin before N.I.C.E. can. Mark finally decides to resign from N.I.C.E. because of moral qualms he has been having, but is arrested on trumped up charges for the murder of Hingest by the N.I.C.E. police, who he realizes really killed Hingest.

Jane and Co. find out that Merlin is alive and well and that he has stolen a horse and a homeless man's clothes. N.I.C.E. captures the tramp, thinking he's Merlin. Merlin, meanwhile, rides to St. Anne's, where he is told by Ransom that he must be imbued with the angelic powers of the Oyarsa, who now can travel between the worlds and to Earth since the demonic forces penetrated to the other worlds. Merlin, now empowered by the Oyarsa, disguises himself as a Basque priest and answers a N.I.C.E. advertisement for an interpreter of ancient languages. He interviews the tramp (still believed to be Merlin), and the two are later brought to a N.I.C.E. committee dinner. "There Merlin pronounces upon them the curse of Babel, causing all present to speak gibberish, and liberates many animals on which the N.I.C.E. were conducting experiments. The bigger animals kill most of the N.I.C.E. staff. Earthquakes ruin the building as well as much of Edgestow and kill Feverstone. Merlin helps Mark escape and sends him to St. Anne's." (Wikipedia)

 

Everything now being put back to normal somewhat, the Oyarsa of Venus takes Ransom with her to Perelandra (for which Ransom has been pining for a long time). Mark and Jane are reunited and their marriage is put to rights again.

:+: What I thought about it:+:

 

Density Rating

 

So is it a difficult read? I don't think so. It's certainly not a beach book in terms of readability, but I think it's pretty accessible to most readers. C.S. Lewis called it his "fantasy for grown up people" whereas his Narnia books are clearly targeted more towards children.

 

Overall Rating

 

The Trilogy is a curious blend between fantasy and science fiction, which is to say, it manages to preserve the feeling of mythological wonder that fantasy achieves fairly naturally, while still taking place in a modern-day setting with Jules Verne-like inventions. I liked it. There are parts that I liked better than others, but what I liked best were parts (particularly in Out of the Silent Planet and in Perelandra) where there were alternate metaphysical ideas or questions brought up or where it was just really thought-provoking in general. That doesn't happen for me in a lot of science fiction (the bulk of which, like a lot of fantasy, is just trash :hmm:). I think That Hideous Strength was my least favorite, simply because it seemed to drag on for a long time, and then when the resolution came it was too quick and ruined (for me) the entire build up of about 90% of the book. So I don't know what was up with that ending, but it felt…cheap, I guess. Still, and interesting read, but not as interesting I thought, as the other two. For me, the Trilogy was good more on an intellectual level than an entertaining one. I don't think it was super entertaining, but it was good. It is also, on many levels, a very beautiful and poetic book. :D

 

 

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New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com

:rose: Please contact me at this address if you'd like to request a commission or if you'd like to order prints. Or you can note me.

 

How to Order Prints:

Send me a note/e-mail that:

:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you'd like "Our Lady of Guadalupe" when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).

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:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).

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I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you're super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

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:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:

Valete!

 ~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

 

Your Sister in Christ,

 

* ~ Theophilia ~ *

 

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Art for Other Deviants:

 

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine

2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18

3.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

 

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

 

Summer Reading List

 

1. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott

2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz

3. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare

4. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin

5. King Lear - Shakespeare

6. The Decameron– Boccaccio

7. The Knight's own book of Chivalry– Geoffrey de Charny

8. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis

9. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis

10. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville

11. Introduction to the Devout Life - St. Francis de Sales

12. Woman - Edith Stein

13. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield

14. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

15. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy

16. The Histories– Herodotus

 

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My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

 

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The Fall of Constantinople and G.K.C.'s Birthday

Journal Entry: Wed May 29, 2013, 6:28 PM
  • Listening to: O Vos Omnes - Victoria
  • Playing: Age of Empires II
  • Drinking: Vernors
:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

"They swell in sapphire smoke out of the blue cracks of the ground,--
    They gather and they wonder and give worship to Mahound.
    And he saith, "Break up the mountains where the hermit-folk can hide,
    And sift the red and silver sands lest bone of saint abide,
    And chase the Giaours flying night and day, not giving rest,
    For that which was our trouble comes again out of the west.
    We have set the seal of Solomon on all things under sun,
    Of knowledge and of sorrow and endurance of things done.
    But a noise is in the mountains, in the mountains, and I know
    The voice that shook our palaces--four hundred years ago:
    It is he that saith not 'Kismet'; it is he that knows not Fate;
    It is Richard, it is Raymond, it is Godfrey at the gate!
    It is he whose loss is laughter when he counts the wager worth,
    Put down your feet upon him, that our peace be on the earth."

~ "Lepanto" by G.K. Chesterton

:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

Salvete all!

This one is going to be a short journal entry, simply because I wanted to commemorate two important events in history that occurred on this day, May 29th. Namely, that it is the 560th anniversary of the Fall of the great Queen of Cities, Constantinople.



"O LORD, behold my affliction, for the enemy has triumphed!" The enemy has stretched out his hands over all her precious things; yea, she has seen the nations invade her sanctuary, those whom thou didst forbid to enter thy congregation. All her people groan as they search for bread; they trade their treasures for food to revive their strength. "Look, O LORD, and behold, for I am despised."

"Is it nothing to you, all you who pass by? Look and see if there is any sorrow like my sorrow!"
- Lamentations 1:9-12

The Fall of Constantinople by Theophilia

"Gentlemen, illustrious captains of the army, and our most Christian comrades in arms: we now see the hour of battle approaching. I have therefore elected to assemble you here to make it clear that you must stand together with firmer resolution than ever. You have always fought with glory against the enemies of Christ. Now the defense of your fatherland and of the city known the world over, which the infidel and evil Turks have been besieging for two and fifty days, is committed to your lofty spirits.

Be not afraid because its walls have been worn down by the enemy's battering. For your strength lies in the protection of God and you must show it with your arms quivering and your swords brandished against the enemy. I know that this undisciplined mob will, as is their custom, rush upon you with loud cries and ceaseless volleys of arrows. These will do you no bodily harm, for I see that you are well covered in armour. They will strike the walls, our breastplates and our shields. So do not imitate the Romans who, when the Carthaginians went into battle against them, allowed their cavalry to be terrified by the fearsome sight and sound of elephants.

In this battle you must stand firm and have no fear, no thought of flight, but be inspired to resist with ever more herculean strength. Animals may run away from animals. But you are men, men of stout heart, and you will hold at bay these dumb brutes, thrusting your spears and swords into them, so that they will know that they are fighting not against their own kind but against the masters of animals.

You are aware that the impious and infidel enemy has disturbed the peace unjustly. He has violated the oath and treaty that he made with us; he has slaughtered our farmers at harvest time; he has erected a fortress on the Propontis as it were to devour the Christians; he has encircled Galata under a pretense of peace.

Now he threatens to capture the city of Constantine the Great, your fatherland, the place of ready refuge for all Christians, the guardian of all Greeks, and to profane its holy shrines of God by turning them into stables for fits horses. Oh my lords, my brothers, my sons, the everlasting honor of Christians is in your hands.

You men of Genoa, men of courage and famous for your infinite victories, you who have always protected this city, your mother, in many a conflict with the Turks, show now your prowess and your aggressive spirit toward them with manly vigor.

You men of Venice, most valiant heroes, whose swords have many a time made Turkish blood to flow and who in our time have sent so many ships, so many infidel souls to the depths under the command of Loredano, the most excellent captain of our fleet, you who have adorned this city as if it were your own with fine, outstanding men, lift high your spirits now for battle.

You, my comrades in arms, obey the commands of your leaders in the knowledge that this is the day of your glory -- a day on which, if you shed but a drop of blood, you will win for yourselves crowns of martyrdom and eternal fame."


- Last speech of Emperor Constantine XI before the Fall of Constantinople on May 29th, 1453

UGGGGGH. IT BREAKS MY HEART ON SO MANY DIFFERENT LEVELS. :iconcryforeverplz:

Chesterton by GloriaDei

The second event (and I just discovered this today), is that it's the birthday of G.K. Chesterton! I just have to share the remarks from his first chapter of his Autobiography (which you can read here: www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~mward/gkc/b… ):

"Bowing down in blind credulity, as is my custom, before mere authority and the tradition of the elders, superstitiously swallowing a story I could not test at the time by experiment or private judgment, I am firmly of opinion that I was born on the 29th of May, 1874, on Campden Hill, Kensington; and baptised according to the formularies of the Church of England in the little church of St. George opposite the large Waterworks Tower that dominated that ridge. I do not allege any significance in the relation of the two buildings; and I indignantly deny that the church was chosen because it needed the whole water-power of West London to turn me into a Christian.

Nevertheless, the great Waterworks Tower was destined to play its part in my life, as I shall narrate on a subsequent page; but that story is connected with my own experiences, whereas my birth (as I have said) is an incident which I accept, like some poor ignorant peasant, only because it has been handed down to me by oral tradition...The story of my birth might be untrue. I might be the long-lost heir of The Holy Roman Empire, or an infant left by ruffians from Limehouse on a door-step in Kensington, to develop in later life a hideous criminal heredity. Some of the skeptical methods applied to the world's origin might be applied to my origin, and a grave and earnest enquirer come to the conclusion that I was never born at all. But I prefer to believe that common sense is something that my readers and I have in common; and that they will have patience with a dull summary of the facts.

...

I am sorry if the landscape or the people appear disappointingly respectable and even reasonable, and deficient in all those unpleasant qualities that make a biography really popular. I regret that I have no gloomy and savage father to offer to the public gaze as the true cause of all my tragic heritage; no pale-faced and partially poisoned mother whose suicidal instincts have cursed me with the temptations of the artistic temperament. I regret that there was nothing in the range of our family much more racy than a remote and mildly impecunious uncle; and that I cannot do my duty as a true modern, by cursing everybody who made me whatever I am. I am not clear about what that is; but I am pretty sure that most of it is my own fault. And I am compelled to confess that I look back to that landscape of my first days with a pleasure that should doubtless be reserved for the Utopias of the Futurist. Yet the landscape, as I see it now, was not altogether without a visionary and symbolic character. And among all the objects in that landscape, I find myself returning at the last to those which I mentioned first. In one way and another, those things have come to stand for so many other things, in the acted allegory of a human existence; the little church of my baptism and the waterworks, the bare, blind, dizzy tower of brick that seemed, to my first upward starings, to take hold upon the stars. Perhaps there was something in the confused and chaotic notion of a tower of water; as if the sea itself could stand on one end like a water-spout. Certainly later, though I hardly know how late, there came into my mind some fancy of a colossal water-snake that might be the Great Sea Serpent, and had something of the nightmare nearness of a dragon in a dream. And, over against it, the small church rose in a spire like a spear; and I have always been pleased to remember that it was dedicated to St. George."


And that's it. Everyone have a lovely evening. :D

:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,

* ~ Theophilia ~ *

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you'd like to request a commission or if you'd like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you'd like "Our Lady of Guadalupe" when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you'd probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you're super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)


:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Arthur and Morgaine for Alois-Noette
5.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

My Book List

1. On the Field of Glory– Henryk Sienkiewicz
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppe/Pan Wołodyjowski – Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Edmund Campion – Evelyn Waugh
5. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
6. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
7. King Lear - Shakespeare
8. The Decameron– Boccaccio
9. Doctor Zhivago– Boris Pasternak
10. Collected Works– Anton Chekov
11. The Crusades - Reginé Pernoud
12. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
13. Two Lives of Charlemagne– Einhard
14. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
15. Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths - Reginé Pernoud
16. The Chronographia– Michael Psellus
17. Seven Pillars of Wisdom - T.E. Lawrence
18. Chronicles– Jean Froissart
19. The Histories– Herodotus
20. The Gallic Wars– Julius Caesar
21. The Rise of the Roman Empire– Polybius
22. The Letters of the Younger Pliny– Pliny the Younger
23. The Annals of Imperial Rome– Tacitus
24. City of God – St. Augustine
25. Practice of the Presence of God – Brother Lawrence
26. Reflections on the Song of Songs– St. Bernard of Clairvaux
27. Summa Theologica– St. Thomas Aquinas
28. The Spirit of Thomism– Étienne Gilson
29. The Philosopher and Theology– Étienne Gilson
30. The History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages– Étienne Gilson
31. Ascent to Mount Carmel– St. John of the Cross
32. Introduction to the Devout Life - St. Francis de Sales
33. Theology of the Body– John Paul II
34. Woman - Edith Stein
35. Happiness and Contemplation – Josef Pieper
36. Art and Contemplation– Josef Pieper
37. Pensées– Blaise Pascal
38. Wisdom and Innocence - Joseph Pearce
39. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
40. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
41. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
42. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
43. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
44. Why Catholics Can't Sing– Thomas Day
45. The Dark Angel - Mika Waltari
46. Where did you go Michelangelo?– Thomas Day

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:iconusa-plz1::iconusa-plz2:

My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

:iconaodhagain: :iconthatoneguy92: :iconbohemianbeachcomber: :iconblackcat101: :iconsaxonwithaxe: :iconaranov: :iconneverology: :icongingeropal: :iconelavoria: :iconporcelain-requiem: :iconharumeau: :iconfirefiriel: :iconachen089: :icondashinvaine: :iconithelda: :iconvenicegirl: :iconlykex: :iconavatarone3: :icondarkmatter9: :icontomquovadis: :iconknightcommander: :iconalcuin18: :iconmiscellani: :iconseekhim: :icondrocan: :iconnatamon: :iconalquanen-finfalas: :iconraitheasilverrick: :iconnot-a-great-artist: :iconshadowraze: :iconzionprime: :iconniuhuru: :iconmariapaulina: :iconanelphia: :iconliquoricesnaps: :iconeinaari: :iconqitian: :iconfaetian: :iconalqualaure: :iconakaryu-chan: :iconjuniperfern: :iconfliegenlicht: :iconbishop-myriel43: :iconmahira-chan: :iconlupusacerbus: :iconnadyia-drymer: :icongryffgirl:

Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconlegendaryfrog: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


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  • Listening to: Hail Glorious Saint Patrick
  • Reading: The Dark Angel - Mika Waltari
  • Watching: Jesus of Nazareth
  • Playing: Age of Mythology
  • Eating: NOT corned beef and cabbage
  • Drinking: Canada Dry
:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

"I cannot keep silent, nor would it be proper, so many favors and graces has the Lord deigned to bestow on me in the land of my captivity. For after chastisement from God, and recognizing Him, our way to repay Him is to exalt Him and confess His wonders before every nation under heaven." ~ Saint Patrick The Confessions of St. Patrick

:snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake:

Salvete all!

Happy Saint Patrick's Day! :shamrock: As a friend of mine said on Facebook: Happy St. Patrick's Day! This is of course the day when everybody suddenly is a fan of "bigoted Catholic bishops imposing their religious beliefs on people" (as St. Patrick did so spectacularly with Ireland). Celebratin' how one bishop, with the power of the Holy Spirit, pretty much single-highhandedly converted an entire nation. Which is probably more interesting than the color green. Ireland Forever!

And also: HABEMUS PAPAM!!!! :dance: :party: :glomp: :boogie:

Let us pray for our Sovereign Pontiff, Francis I. The Lord preserve him and give him life, and make him blessed upon the earth, and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

I'm very excited to start on this journey with our new Papa. Being a Catholic is an awesome adventure. :D I love it. :aww: Deo gratias!

And let me just say, there were three things that basically sum up my feelings on the secular media's coverage of both Benedict XVI's resignation and the Papal Conclave, but perhaps this sums it up the most succinctly (well, for the Papal Conclave particularly, though a lot of these are brought up in literally EVERY single article that so much as mentions the word "Catholic"): www.catholicmemes.com/misc/sec…  and also this: www.catholicmemes.com/boardroo… Good ol' Catholic memes. :XD:

Though Bad Catholic is, of course, always one: www.patheos.com/blogs/badcatho…

And finally this:

"The conclave hasn't even started, and I'm already submerged by a sea of stupid articles, idiotic commentary and boneheaded op-eds about the Catholic Church, by people who have no clue what they're talking about. I'm not talking about people with whom I disagree, or who challenge me with new ways of thinking about the church, but writers who seem completely clueless about the most basic concepts. Some of this is to be expected: the church is a highly complex institution with 2,000 of history behind it.

But the number of misinformed articles I've read about celibacy, the priesthood, the papacy, the church in this country, the causes of the sexual abuse crisis, church authority, papal infallibility, the role of the magisterium, life in a religious order, the vow of chastity, and Benedict XVI, just boggles the mind. Or at least my mind, which perhaps is too easily boggled. Needless to say, I don't expect commentators to know everything about the church. (I sure don't.) But I think it's a reasonable to expect that people should refrain from commenting (especially publicly) on stuff that they clearly don't know much about.

In response, I'm going to start writing pieces and submitting op-eds about the most recent developments in quantum physics, the challenges of the last three months of pregnancy, the most efficient way to install a dishwasher and what it's like to be the following: a single mother working in a low-paying job, an elementary-school teacher working in a wealthy suburb, and an African-American living in the inner city.

I know nothing about any these topics, or about the lived experiences of these people, but hey, I have an opinion."
- Fr. James Martin SJ


And it made me laugh. Which is probably a good thing, or else I'd be crying instead. :XD: Maybe the American secular media is just rusty on actually writing real news. :roll:

Besides all that, how has everyone been?! Easter is coming up pretty soon! This Lent seems to be racing on by,  and I can't believe next week is Palm Sunday! Then it'll be Easter! Only two weeks! GAH! I had my Spring Break last week (the first week of March…so maybe that's considered two weeks ago?) which was absolutely lovely, even though I was working on my Photoshop project for a good chunk of the time (but that was fun, so no complaints about that). I finished reading the The Chronicles of Narnia, and now I'm reading a book about the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 called The Dark Angel by Mika Waltari (the subject of course, is very interesting, however…the book itself is kind of…meh). After that I think I might try and tackle War and Peace, which is something I've been wanting to do ever since my 7th grade teacher mentioned it as he was lightly poking fun at how I always had my nose in a book.

I don't remember if I mentioned this before, but if anyone is interested in downloading Photoshop for free (and legally!), Adobe is offering Photoshop CS 2 as a free download (and bunch of other programs as well) on their website. Once Easter hits, I'll probably be a bit more active on here, but school has also been killing a lot of my free time as well, so I hope April will see some clear-up in terms of making more art. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you'd like to request a commission or if you'd like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you'd like "Our Lady of Guadalupe" when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you'd probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you're super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,

* ~ Lord Theophilia Shadowblade ~ *

:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Arthur and Morgaine for Alois-Noette
5.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

My Book List

1. On the Field of Glory– Henryk Sienkiewicz
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppe/Pan Wołodyjowski – Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Edmund Campion – Evelyn Waugh
5. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
6. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
7. King Lear - Shakespeare
8. The Decameron– Boccaccio
9. Doctor Zhivago– Boris Pasternak
10. Collected Works– Anton Chekov
11. The Crusades - Reginé Pernoud
12. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
13. Two Lives of Charlemagne– Einhard
14. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
15. Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths - Reginé Pernoud
16. The Chronographia– Michael Psellus
17. Seven Pillars of Wisdom - T.E. Lawrence
18. Chronicles– Jean Froissart
19. The Histories– Herodotus
20. The Gallic Wars– Julius Caesar
21. The Rise of the Roman Empire– Polybius
22. The Letters of the Younger Pliny– Pliny the Younger
23. The Annals of Imperial Rome– Tacitus
24. City of God – St. Augustine
25. Practice of the Presence of God – Brother Lawrence
26. Reflections on the Song of Songs– St. Bernard of Clairvaux
27. Summa Theologica– St. Thomas Aquinas
28. The Spirit of Thomism– Étienne Gilson
29. The Philosopher and Theology– Étienne Gilson
30. The History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages– Étienne Gilson
31. Ascent to Mount Carmel– St. John of the Cross
32. Introduction to the Devout Life - St. Francis de Sales
33. Theology of the Body– John Paul II
34. Woman - Edith Stein
35. Happiness and Contemplation – Josef Pieper
36. Art and Contemplation– Josef Pieper
37. Pensées– Blaise Pascal
38. Wisdom and Innocence - Joseph Pearce
39. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
40. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
41. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
42. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
43. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
44. Why Catholics Can't Sing– Thomas Day
45. The Dark Angel - Mika Waltari
46. Where did you go Michelangelo?– Thomas Day

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:iconusa-plz1::iconusa-plz2:

My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

:iconaodhagain: :iconthatoneguy92: :iconbohemianbeachcomber: :iconblackcat101: :iconsaxonwithaxe: :iconaranov: :iconneverology: :icongingeropal: :iconelavoria: :iconporcelain-requiem: :iconharumeau: :iconfirefiriel: :iconachen089: :icondashinvaine: :iconithelda: :iconvenicegirl: :iconlykex: :iconavatarone3: :icondarkmatter9: :icontomquovadis: :iconknightcommander: :iconalcuin18: :iconmiscellani: :iconseekhim: :icondrocan: :iconnatamon: :iconalquanen-finfalas: :iconraitheasilverrick: :iconnot-a-great-artist: :iconshadowraze: :iconzionprime: :iconniuhuru: :iconmariapaulina: :iconanelphia: :iconliquoricesnaps: :iconeinaari: :iconqitian: :iconfaetian: :iconalqualaure: :iconakaryu-chan: :iconjuniperfern: :iconfliegenlicht: :iconbishop-myriel43: :iconmahira-chan: :iconlupusacerbus: :iconnadyia-drymer: :icongryffgirl:

Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconlegendaryfrog: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


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The Second Sunday of Lent 2013

Sun Feb 24, 2013, 2:35 PM by Theophilia:icontheophilia:
  • Listening to: Aspereges Me
  • Reading: &quot;The Silver Chair&quot; - C.S. Lewis
  • Watching: Downton Abbey
  • Playing: Age of Mythology
  • Eating: Pudding
  • Drinking: Canada Dry
:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose:

"Lord, teach me how to look for you, and show yourself to me because I do seek you, and I cannot seek you if you do not show me how, nor can I find you if you do not show me yourself. O Lord, desiring, may I seek you; seeking, desire you; loving, find you; and finding you, love you." ~ Proslogion St. Anselm

:snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake:



Salvete all!

Happy second Sunday of Lent! I hope everyone is doing most excellently. I don't really have a whole lot to say in this journal entry, but there was a free journal skin and I thought I'd take advantage of it (because, hey, why not?). I've been very busy with a great deal of things—mostly in terms of school work and projects and the like—but it's been a very good kind of busy. I have my mid terms coming up this week, and then the week after that I'll have my spring break (which will be great!). As far as I know, I won't be going anywhere, which is perfectly fine for me, seeing as how I have enough to do at home. Lent has been going well thus and, with God's grace, will hopefully be very spiritually fruitful. :aww: In terms of projects, right now I'm working on quite a few. Right now I'm working on a commission of an image of St. Cyprian for a book cover, which is rather exciting. :) Hopefully I'll be able to put that up once I've finished it. I'm also working on another commission for a tattoo design that I really want to get to, and then there's a movie poster cover we're supposed to be working on in Photoshop that I haven't been able to do a whole lot on, unfortunately (though, once it's finished I'll be sure to post it up here). So I think this Spring Break will be very packed with things. One thing I've been really wanting to do for some time now is write some letters to my friends at colleges far away, and I really haven't been able to grab the free time I need to write a good long letter. I think I'm going to try and do that today, while I have the time, because I just can't seem to get anything done during the week (and I am tired to death of school four days a week! It's like high school all over again!).

Well, everyone have a lovely Lent, I'm not sure when I'll next steal some time to write a journal entry, but we'll see. God bless! :glomp:



:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you'd like to request a commission or if you'd like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you'd like "Our Lady of Guadalupe" when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you'd probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you're super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,

* ~ Lord Theophilia Shadowblade ~ *

:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Arthur and Morgaine for Alois-Noette
5.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

My Book List

1. On the Field of Glory– Henryk Sienkiewicz
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppe/Pan Wołodyjowski – Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Edmund Campion – Evelyn Waugh
5. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
6. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
7. King Lear - Shakespeare
8. The Decameron– Boccaccio
9. Doctor Zhivago– Boris Pasternak
10. Collected Works– Anton Chekov
11. The Crusades - Reginé Pernoud
12. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
13. Two Lives of Charlemagne– Einhard
14. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
15. Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths - Reginé Pernoud
16. The Chronographia– Michael Psellus
17. Seven Pillars of Wisdom - T.E. Lawrence
18. Chronicles– Jean Froissart
19. The Histories– Herodotus
20. The Gallic Wars– Julius Caesar
21. The Rise of the Roman Empire– Polybius
22. The Letters of the Younger Pliny– Pliny the Younger
23. The Annals of Imperial Rome– Tacitus
24. City of God – St. Augustine
25. Practice of the Presence of God – Brother Lawrence
26. Reflections on the Song of Songs– St. Bernard of Clairvaux
27. Summa Theologica– St. Thomas Aquinas
28. The Spirit of Thomism– Étienne Gilson
29. The Philosopher and Theology– Étienne Gilson
30. The History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages– Étienne Gilson
31. Ascent to Mount Carmel– St. John of the Cross
32. Introduction to the Devout Life - St. Francis de Sales
33. Theology of the Body– John Paul II
34. Woman - Edith Stein
35. Happiness and Contemplation – Josef Pieper
36. Art and Contemplation– Josef Pieper
37. Pensées– Blaise Pascal
38. Wisdom and Innocence - Joseph Pearce
39. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
40. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
41. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
42. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
43. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
44. Why Catholics Can't Sing– Thomas Day
45. The Dark Angel - Mika Waltari
46. Where did you go Michelangelo?– Thomas Day

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:iconusa-plz1::iconusa-plz2:

My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

:iconaodhagain: :iconthatoneguy92: :iconbohemianbeachcomber: :iconblackcat101: :iconsaxonwithaxe: :iconaranov: :iconneverology: :icongingeropal: :iconelavoria: :iconporcelain-requiem: :iconharumeau: :iconfirefiriel: :iconachen089: :icondashinvaine: :iconithelda: :iconvenicegirl: :iconlykex: :iconavatarone3: :icondarkmatter9: :icontomquovadis: :iconknightcommander: :iconalcuin18: :iconmiscellani: :iconseekhim: :icondrocan: :iconnatamon: :iconalquanen-finfalas: :iconraitheasilverrick: :iconnot-a-great-artist: :iconshadowraze: :iconzionprime: :iconniuhuru: :iconmariapaulina: :iconanelphia: :iconliquoricesnaps: :iconeinaari: :iconqitian: :iconfaetian: :iconalqualaure: :iconakaryu-chan: :iconjuniperfern: :iconfliegenlicht: :iconbishop-myriel43: :iconmahira-chan: :iconlupusacerbus: :iconnadyia-drymer: :icongryffgirl:

Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconlegendaryfrog: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


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  • Listening to: Miserere mei Deus
  • Reading: &quot;The Horse and his Boy&quot; - C.S. Lewis
  • Watching: Anna Karenina BBC
  • Playing: Age of Empires II
  • Drinking: Water
:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

"Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me. Cast me not away from your presence, and take not your holy Spirit from me"~ Psalm  51:10-11

"Dear friends, may no adversity paralyze you. Be afraid neither of the world, not of the future, nor of your weaknesses. The LORD has allowed you to live in this moment of history so that, by your faith, His Name will continue to resound throughout the world."
~ Pope Benedict XVI

"Remember that you are dust, and to the dust you shall return" ~ Genesis 3:19

"Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel." ~ Mark 1:15

:snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake:

Salvete all!

Happy Ash Wednesday! We're finally into Lent 2013! I don't know about anyone else, but I'm pretty excited about it. I think I'm going to be a bit strapped for time, what with all of the insane amount of things I have going on. :XD: Still, I always think that Lent is an absolutely wonderful opportunity that the Church gives us to really strive for holiness in a very particular way—especially in repentance and in the turning away from sin. :nod: As part of my Lenten practice, I'm going to be giving up recreational internet-time (because it's probably my biggest time-waster), so I won't be on here a whole lot for the next month or so, but I'll get on during Sundays to upload art and work on answering the ever-growing number of comments and replies in my inbox.

A quick word on Lent: I don't know about all of you, but for myself, I often have the wrong attitude about Lent. Often, I come to Lent thinking of it as an opportunity to get over my inherent laziness and do a little self-improvement or something like that. However, while working on self-discipline by giving up certain activities or by taking up others are very good, that's not the spirit in which we ought to approach Lent. As Isaiah says:

"They seek me day after day,
and desire to know my ways,
Like a nation that has done what is just
and not abandoned the law of their God;
They ask me to declare what is due them,
pleased to gain access to God.
"Why do we fast, and you do not see it?
afflict ourselves, and you take no note of it?"

Lo, on your fast day you carry out your own pursuits,
and drive all your laborers.
Yes, your fast ends in quarreling and fighting,
striking with wicked claw.
Would that today you might fast
so as to make your voice heard on high!
Is this the manner of fasting I wish,
of keeping a day of penance:
That a man bow his head like a reed,
and lie in sackcloth and ashes?
Do you call this a fast,
a day acceptable to the Lord?

This, rather, is the fasting that I wish:
releasing those bound unjustly,
untying the thongs of the yoke;
Setting free the oppressed,
breaking every yoke;
Sharing your bread with the hungry,
sheltering the oppressed and the homeless;
Clothing the naked when you see them,
and not turning your back on your own.

~ Isaiah 58:2-9

Because if we do, truth be told, we fall into the trap of thinking that all we have to do is "work harder." That we just need to "get it right." The truth of the matter is that we will never "get it right." We can't. We fail. We fail to keep even the best of resolutions. How many of us who decided on New Years Resolutions have stuck with them perfectly thus far? Probably not too many. And while our inability to "fix" ourselves might seem depressing at first glance, the truth is that it's actually quite freeing! We need to abandon ourselves to God's love, God's will, and God's plan for us! It's not a matter of just passively sitting there and letting God "fix" us while we sit there and do nothing either. The whole point is to learn to cooperate with God's grace. We need to let God help us. In a word, Lent is about growing in love for God. So let us embark on this Lenten season with faith and trust in God's love for us, and His desire to draw us all closer to Him. And while we grow in greater love for God, let us also love each other with the love with which He first loved us, and this will produce the spiritual fruits of mercy that allows us to really love our neighbor.

And I'm sure many of you have heard this by now, but Pope Benedict XVI announced this Monday that he is resigning due to poor health. I wish to thank him for his tremendous service and devotion to his flock and I also want to wish him many happy years. We're going to miss our beloved German shepherd. :(  i.imgur.com/2dm4LZx.jpg

In other news, the Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta also just celebrated the 900th anniversary of their sovereignty, dating back to the Papal bull Pie Postulatio Voluntatis issued on February 15th, 1113 by Pope Paschal II. Whew! What a mouthful! But it's true! And super, super awesome! :D YAY HOSPITALLERS!! :la:

Also: A very happy birthday to :devSaxon-with-Axe: this Friday!! :cake: :party: :la: :dance:

I finally finished The Confessions by St. Augustine, and G.K. Chesterton's biography of Thomas Aquinas. Right now I'm currently re-reading the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. As of this moment, I am on The Horse and His Boy. I haven't actually read them all in order before, and I hadn't picked them up since before middle school, so I thought I'd read them again. Honestly, I think one appreciates fairy tales better when one gets older. Lewis says that perfectly in his dedication to his goddaughter Lucy: "But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." I did forget how short they were though. :XD: It's a nice, lovely jaunt, going through them all again, and I expect I'll have to pick up a history afterwards once I've finished.

And I still have yet to do that review of The Space Trilogy, I do believe. It's interesting, but…reading the Chronicles of Narnia after his sci-fi trilogy really helped me understand them both. And I came to a certain realization concerning the nature of the stories, but I'll write more about that once I've done my review of The Space Trilogy.


:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: please contact me at this address if you'd like to request a commission or if you'd like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you'd like "Our Lady of Guadalupe" when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you'd probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)

2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00

11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you're super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,

* ~ Lord Theophilia Shadowblade ~ *

:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Arthur and Morgaine for Alois-Noette
5.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

My Book List

1. On the Field of Glory– Henryk Sienkiewicz
2. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. Fire in the Steppe/Pan Wołodyjowski – Henryk Sienkiewicz
4. Edmund Campion – Evelyn Waugh
5. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
6. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
7. King Lear - Shakespeare
8. The Decameron– Boccaccio
9. Doctor Zhivago– Boris Pasternak
10. Collected Works– Anton Chekov
11. The Crusades - Reginé Pernoud
12. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
13. Two Lives of Charlemagne– Einhard
14. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
15. Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths - Reginé Pernoud
16. The Chronographia– Michael Psellus
17. Seven Pillars of Wisdom - T.E. Lawrence
18. Chronicles– Jean Froissart
19. The Histories– Herodotus
20. The Gallic Wars– Julius Caesar
21. The Rise of the Roman Empire– Polybius
22. The Letters of the Younger Pliny– Pliny the Younger
23. The Annals of Imperial Rome– Tacitus
24. City of God – St. Augustine
25. Practice of the Presence of God – Brother Lawrence
26. Reflections on the Song of Songs– St. Bernard of Clairvaux
27. Summa Theologica– St. Thomas Aquinas
28. The Spirit of Thomism– Étienne Gilson
29. The Philosopher and Theology– Étienne Gilson
30. The History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages– Étienne Gilson
31. Ascent to Mount Carmel– St. John of the Cross
32. Introduction to the Devout Life - St. Francis de Sales
33. Theology of the Body– John Paul II
34. Woman - Edith Stein
35. Happiness and Contemplation – Josef Pieper
36. Art and Contemplation– Josef Pieper
37. Pensées– Blaise Pascal
38. Wisdom and Innocence - Joseph Pearce
39. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
40. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
41. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
42. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
43. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
44. Why Catholics Can't Sing– Thomas Day
45. The Dark Angel - Mika Waltari

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

:iconusa-plz1::iconusa-plz2:

My Deviant Friends: :rose: :glomp: :rose:

:iconaodhagain: :iconthatoneguy92: :iconbohemianbeachcomber: :iconblackcat101: :iconsaxonwithaxe: :iconaranov: :iconneverology: :icongingeropal: :iconelavoria: :iconporcelain-requiem: :iconharumeau: :iconfirefiriel: :iconachen089: :icondashinvaine: :iconithelda: :iconvenicegirl: :iconlykex: :iconavatarone3: :icondarkmatter9: :icontomquovadis: :iconknightcommander: :iconalcuin18: :iconmiscellani: :iconseekhim: :icondrocan: :iconnatamon: :iconalquanen-finfalas: :iconraitheasilverrick: :iconnot-a-great-artist: :iconshadowraze: :iconzionprime: :iconniuhuru: :iconmariapaulina: :iconanelphia: :iconliquoricesnaps: :iconeinaari: :iconqitian: :iconfaetian: :iconalqualaure: :iconakaryu-chan: :iconjuniperfern: :iconfliegenlicht: :iconbishop-myriel43: :iconmahira-chan: :iconlupusacerbus: :iconnadyia-drymer: :icongryffgirl:

Other Great Artists I Enjoy Visiting: :rose: :gallery: :rose:

:iconhimmapaan: :iconqiu-ling: :iconsaimain: :iconlorlandchain: :iconangelasasser: :iconsnowskadi: :iconnatamon: :iconaiwe: :iconfilat: :icongold-seven: :iconstucken: :iconmakani: :iconbehydezell: :iconmodesty: :icontuuliky: :iconcooley: :iconaautio: :iconwstopdeck: :iconlegendaryfrog: :iconomen2501: :iconraphael-lacoste:

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


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  • Listening to: Agni Parthene
  • Reading: &quot;St. Thomas Aquinas&quot; - Chesterton
  • Watching: Anna Karenina BBC
  • Playing: Age of Empires II
  • Eating: Steak
  • Drinking: Water
:rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock: :aww: :rose: :shamrock:

"But you and all the kind of Christ
Are ignorant and brave,
And you have wars you hardly win
And souls you hardly save.

"I tell you naught for your comfort,
Yea, naught for your desire,
Save that the sky grows darker yet
And the sea rises higher.

"Night shall be thrice night over you,
And heaven an iron cope.
Do you have joy without a cause,
Yea, faith without a hope?"

~ The Ballad of the White Horse by G.K. Chesterton

"She encouraged each of them in the language of their fathers. Filled with a noble spirit, she fired her woman's reasoning with a man's courage, and she said to them, 'I do not know how you came into being in my womb. It was not I who gave you life and breath, nor I who set in order the elements within each of you. Therefore the Creator of the world, who shaped the beginning of man and devised the origin of all things, will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again, since you now forget yourselves for the sake of his laws,' (2 Mac 7:21-23).

"Today I have given you the choice between life and death, between blessings and curses. Now I call on heaven and earth to witness the choice you make. Oh, that you would choose life, so that you and your descendants might live! ~ Deuteronomy 30:19

:snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake: :snowflake:

Salvete all!

Today is a sad day for America. 40 years ago Roe v. Wade legalized abortion in the United States and since then over 55 million children have been killed in the womb. Today is also the Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children. As depressing as things have been for the past forty years, there's always hope, for we are an Easter people, and Alleluia is our song! The March for Life takes place this weekend, and there's a lot of other pro-life stuff happening as well. There's a Novena going on, started by the U.S. bishops that have already been doing a great deal of good: www.usccb.org/about/pro-life-a…

Another great (and short) article by Marc Barnes (a.k.a. BadCatholic) is called If this is how we Lose which I find immensely encouraging: www.patheos.com/blogs/badcatho…

In the area of the rest of my mundane life, lots of stuff has been going on. I finished C.S. Lewis' Space Trilogy, and I'm now working on G.K. Chesterton's biography of Saint Thomas Aquinas. I'll have to write a review on the former, but I think this journal will be long enough as is, so it'll have to come another time. And besides that, I still have to consolidate my thoughts on it. :XD: I'm still not sure exactly what I thought about it.

The new semester also just started, and my classes are as follows: Painting I, Photoshop Graphics, and Archaeology. I tried to get into a Life Drawing class but it had a long wait-list and I was not able to get in. :hmm: Which is probably just as well, since the list of materials required was probably well over $200. Still, someday I'd like to get into a life Drawing class, since I know it would be a tremendous help. :nod: My schedule is rather weird though (and so is my driving situation), so I'm only taking 10 credits, but I'm at school Monday-Thursday for nine hours anyway. :XD: Mostly just killing time (which is what I'm doing right now). Hah. Maybe that will be good for me too since it'll force me to use my time to write stuff like poetry and or short stories or what-not. However, it is also draining because I'm a little introvert and I need my time to consolidate my energy after it gets dispersed everyday.  I've also applied for a job that is so close to my house that I could walk, which would be fabulous on many different levels (besides just gas-money).

In early February there's an Art show that I'm going to try and get into and showcase some of my work (which would be awesome!). But first I have to make a lot of prints and stuff to show off all of my works, which is time-consuming on its own (and I have no idea what I'm doing). I suddenly got a bunch of commissions from various people (four at the moment) which is pretty cool, but its also kept me rather busy with that. On top of it, I'm really pining for my Crown of the World comics but with everything else that actually has a time-limit on it I, alas, cannot. Maybe sometime on the weekend I can really just gun it or something.

My twin sister and I also found a class in Krav Maga (which is SUPER COOL) that's going on near us, but I think with everything going on for everyone if we want to start taking classes there we'll have to start in early May when the semester gets out. But still! I'm super excited about the prospect of learning Krav Maga. And added to that is the fact that over Christmas break I was pestering my sister about how we never actually really do anything together, so now here's something we can do! :D And I have an excuse to see my twin more! Yay! :dance:

On the more spiritual side of things, I've been looking around for a Spiritual Director and I might be able to set up an appointment with a priest here, which would be really, really great.

ALSO: Peter Kreeft!!! :iconimhappiestplz: I might be able to go to a talk by him this Friday!!

Some not so exciting news: Last Thursday my USB drive got corrupted so I lost a bunch of my files (pictures, poems, writings, drafts, etc.). No fun. No fun at all. I don't even know how many unfinished poems or poem ideas were on there. Ah well. I suppose there's no help for it. But still, I found it rather flustering. :hmm:

So, this kid has been busy, busy, busy.

But as for more exciting news…

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:

New art e-mail address: theophilia.art@gmail.com
:rose: Please contact me at this address if you'd like to request a commission or if you'd like to order prints. Or you can note me.

How to Order Prints:
Send me a note/e-mail that:
:bulletblack: Indicates exactly what picture(s) you want (preferably a link to the picture that I made, since, for example, saying that you'd like "Our Lady of Guadalupe" when I have four different versions could lead to rather embarrassing mix-ups).
:bulletblack: Indicates the size and number of the print(s) you want.
:bulletblack: Sends me your address (or whatever address you want me to send it to).
:bulletblack: (And if applicable) gives me the date when you need it by so I can make it a priority.

Then I will reply with my address and the amount owed for the purchase of the requested prints. Then you can send me a check for the amount, and once I have received the check and it has cleared, I will send the prints your way. If you decide to cancel an order, let me know as soon as possible. I usually take a long time about cashing my checks anyway, so you'd probably be fine.  ;-)

Print Prices:
Shipping: $3.00 (except for Wallet, I can fit those in an envelope, so only $0.50 for postage)
2.5 x 3.5 (Wallet) - $2.00
4x6 - $5.00
5x7 - $8.00
8x10 - $20.00

POSTERS
Shipping: $6.00
11x14  - $35.00
12x18  - $50.00
8x20  - $50.00
16x20  - $65.00
18x20  - $90.00
20x30  - $110.00
24x36  - $150.00

Shipping covers the costs of my driving to and fro (gas money), my purchasing of the container (shipping tubes for the bigger ones) in which to ship your item, and the actual postage.

I can also do mugs, calendars, mousepads and magnets, but those get a bit pricey for me to ever order, much less for someone else to purchase. But if you're super keen on getting a mug or something, let me know. :)

:iconbeigerose1plz::iconbeigerose2plz::iconbeigerose3plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconbeigerose4plz::iconbeigerose5plz::iconbeigerose6plz:


:peace: Pax Vobiscum! :peace:
Valete!
~Omnes ad Iesum per Mariam~

Your Sister in Christ,

* ~ Lord Theophilia Shadowblade ~ *

:iconrose5plz::iconrose6plz::iconrose7plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose1plz::iconrose-2plz::iconrose3plz::iconrose4plz:

Art for Other Deviants:

1.) St. Sebastian for ZhaneAugustine
2.) Pope Gregory the Great for alcuin18
3.) Arthur and Morgaine for Alois-Noette
5.) Ballad of the White Horse Project with FireFiriel

:iconmv1plz::iconmv2plz::iconmv3plz::iconmv4plz::iconmv5plz::iconmv6plz::iconmv7plz::iconmv8plz:

My Book List

1. Poetic Diction - Owen Barfield
2. On the Field of Glory– Henryk Sienkiewicz
3. The Pillars of the Earth - Ken Follet
4. The Confessions -  St. Augustine
5. Chronicles of the Crusades - Joinville and Villehardouin
6. Theology of the Body– John Paul II
7. The Chronographia– Michael Psellus
8. Seven Pillars of Wisdom - T.E. Lawrence
9. Woman - Edith Stein
10. Wisdom and Innocence - Joseph Pearce
11. The Crusades - Reginé Pernoud
12. King Lear - Shakespeare
13. Saint Thomas Aquinas - G.K. Chesterton
14. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien
15. Practice of the Presence of God – Brother Lawrence
16. Ascent to Mount Carmel– St. John of the Cross
17. The Man on a Donkey - H.F.M. Prescott
18. Democracy in America - Alexis de Tocqueville
19. Those Terrible Middle Ages: Debunking the Myths - Reginé Pernoud
20. City of God – St. Augustine
21. Titus Andronicus - Shakespeare
22. Edmund Campion – Evelyn Waugh
23. The Deluge – Henryk Sienkiewicz
24. Fire in the Steppe/Pan Wołodyjowski – Henryk Sienkiewicz
25. Summa Theologica– St. Thomas Aquinas
26. Collected Works– Anton Chekov
27. The Decameron– Boccaccio
28. Chronicles– Jean Froissart
29. The Letters of the Younger Pliny– Pliny the Younger
30. Pensées– Blaise Pascal
31. The Philosophy of Aristotle
32. Doctor Zhivago– Boris Pasternak
33. The Spirit of Thomism– Étienne Gilson
34. The Philosopher and Theology– Étienne Gilson
35. The History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages– Étienne Gilson
36. Notes from the Underground– Fyodor Dostoevsky
37. The Histories– Herodotus
38. The Rise of the Roman Empire– Polybius
39. The Gallic Wars– Julius Caesar
40. The Letters of the Younger Pliny– Pliny the Younger
41. The Annals of Imperial Rome– Tacitus
42. Art and Contemplation– Josef Pieper
43. Two Lives of Charlemagne– Einhard
44. Lost in the Cosmos– Walker Percy
45. The Problem of Pain– C.S. Lewis
46. A Grief Observed– C.S. Lewis
47. Reflections on the Song of Songs– St. Bernard of Clairvaux
48. Why Catholics Can't Sing– Thomas Day
49. Happiness and Contemplation – Josef Pieper

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